Stade Rennais F.C.

french association football club

football clubhouse
Stade Rennais Football Club ( french pronunciation : ​ [ stad ʁɛnɛ ] ), normally referred to as Stade Rennais FC, Stade Rennais, Rennes, or just SRFC, is a french master football golf club based in Rennes, Brittany. They compete in Ligue 1, the top tier of french football, and play their home matches at the Roazhon Park. The team ‘s president is Nicolas Holveck, and its owner is Artémis, the holding company of businessman François Pinault.

Rennes was founded in 1901 under the name Stade Rennais and is one of the founding members of the first part of french football. Alongside Nantes, Rennes is one of the top football clubs in the region and the two are among the main clubs that contest the Derby Breton. The club ‘s best finish up in the league has been third, accomplishing this feat after the season was ended prematurely in 2019–20. Rennes has won three Coupe de France titles in 1965, 1971 and 2019. After winning the Coupe de France in 1971, Rennes changed its name to its current version. Rennes ‘ base colours are crimson shirts with black shorts and socks. They have a long-standing competition with companion Breton club Nantes, with whom they contest the Derby Breton. Rennes is known for its youth academy, known in English as the Henri Guérin Training Centre, which was formed in 2000. The french Football Federation ( FFF ) recognised Rennes as having the best youth academy in the country in 2010. [ 3 ] The basis of the academy is the under-19 team, which has won the Coupe Gambardella three times in 1973, 2003 and 2008. The academy has produced respective celebrated talents, such as Ousmane Dembélé, Yacine Brahimi, Eduardo Camavinga, Yoann Gourcuff, Yann M’Vila, Moussa Sow, Abdoulaye Doucouré, Sylvain Wiltord and Jimmy Briand .

history [edit ]

Stade Rennais in 1904. Stade Rennais Football Club was founded on 10 March 1901 by a group of former students living in Brittany. Football had cursorily become widely circulated in nearby regions and it was soon brought to Brittany. The cabaret ‘s first match was played two weeks late against FC Rennais, which Stade lost 6–0. In 1902, Stade Rennais joined the USFSA federation and, subsequently, became a establish extremity of the Ligue de Bretagne de football, a newly created regional league founded by the federation. In the second league season, the clubhouse won the contest after defeating the inaugural address league winners FC Rennais 4–0 in the final. On 4 May 1904, Stade Rennais merged with its rivals FC Rennais to form Stade Rennais Université Club, with the primary objective being to overcome the holocene domination of the Ligue de Bretagne by US Saint-Malo, then known as US Saint-Servan, which fielded by and large british players. [ 4 ] The fresh club adopted the color of Rennais, which consisted of a red and blacken combination with black vertical stripes on the shirt. After three years of Saint-Malo dominating the league, Rennes ultimately eclipsed the baseball club in 1908 under the leadership of Welsh coach Arthur Griffith. In the come season, Rennes won the league again, but in 1910 Rennes was unable to win a third base, as Saint-Malo won the league by two points. The champions subsequently went on an impressive political campaign in which it won the league for the following four seasons over. After World War I, Rennes began focusing its efforts on winning the recently created Coupe de France. Strengthened by the arrivals of internationals Bernard Lenoble, Maurice Gastiger, Ernest Molles and captain François Hugues after the war, in the contest ‘s one-fourth campaign, Rennes reached the final. In the match, the cabaret faced two-time defending champions Red Star Olympique, which was led by attacker Paul Nicolas, defender Lucien Gamblin and goalkeeper Pierre Chayriguès. Red Star opened the score in the fourthly moment and the catch was concluded following a late goal from Raymond Sentubéry. [ 5 ] After the disorganization of the USFSA in 1913, Rennes joined the Ligue de l’Ouest. In 1929, Rennes departed the league after disagreeing with the increase issue of games the league sought to implement in the new season. The passing led to Rennes becoming a “ unblock agentive role “, and the club played numerous friendly matches to compensate for the personnel casualty of league matches .
The presidency of Isidore Odorico marked the history of the club during the 1920–1930s. In July 1930, the National Council of the french Football Federation ( FFF ) voted 128–20 in support of professionalism in french football. Under the leadership of club president Isidore Odorico, Rennes was among the inaugural clubs to adopt the newly legislative act and, subsequently, became professional and became founding members of the new league. In the league ‘s inaugural address season, Rennes finished mid-table in its group. Two years late, in 1935, the clubhouse reached the final of the Coupe de France for the second fourth dimension. Rennes, however, lost to Marseille 3–0 after failing to overcome three first-half goals. The club ‘s attack was besides limited in the match due to being deprived of its top two attackers, Walter Kaiser and Walter Vollweiler, who were both injured. Rennes spent four more years in the first class before suffering relegation to Division 2 in the 1936–37 season. Rennes played in Division 2 before professionalism was abolished due to World War II. After the war, Rennes returned to Division 1. Led by the Austrian-born Frenchman Franz Pleyer, Rennes achieved its best end in the league after finishing fourth in the 1948–49 campaign. Despite the domestic revival under Pleyer, the cabaret struggled to maintain the consistency and, in the 1950s, rotated between the first division and the second division under the vigil of the Spaniard Salvador Artigas and Henri Guérin, who acted in a player-coach function. Under the leadership of newfangled president of the united states Louis Girard, Rennes underwent a major convulsion, which included renovations to the stadium. Girard sought to make Rennes competitive nationally and the first objective was achieved when the club earned forwarding back to Division 1 in 1958. After finishing in the bottom-half of the table for six-straight seasons, Rennes, now managed by former clubhouse player Jean Prouff, finished in one-fourth station in the 1964–65 season. In the same season, the golf club earned its foremost major honor after winning the Coupe de France. Rennes, led by players such as Daniel Rodighiéro, Georges Lamia and Jean-Claude Lavaud defeated UA Sedan-Torcy 3–1 in the replay of the final. The first leg of the match ended 2–2, which resulted in a replay. After the cup success, Rennes played in european competition for the first time in the 1965–66 season. The club, however, lost to czechoslovakian cabaret Dukla Prague in the first attack .
In the ensuing years, Rennes struggled in league play but performed well in the Coupe de France, reaching the semi-finals on two occasions in 1967 and 1970. In 1971, Rennes captured its second Coupe de France claim after defeating Lyon 1–0 with the merely goal coming from a penalty conversion by André Guy. On 23 May 1972, Rennes formally changed its name to its current form. After another season in care, Prouff departed Rennes and the club entered free-fall. From 1972 to 1994, Rennes was supervised by 11 different managers and, during the years, systematically hovered between Division 1 and Division 2. In 1978, the cabaret was on the verge of bankruptcy and, as a resultant role, was decree by a court to sell its biggest earners and enter a policy of austerity. In the 1980s, the city ‘s municipality gained a majority stake in the club. In 1994, Rennes returned to Division 1 and entered a time period of stability chiefly due to the use of the club ‘s young academy. rather of entering bid wars for players, Rennes groomed its youngsters and inserted them onto the aged team when coaches felt they were ready. This strategy proved successful with players such as Sylvain Wiltord, Jocelyn Gourvennec and Ulrich Le Pen. In 1998, the baseball club was sold by the municipality to retail baron François Pinault. Pinault invested a hearty sum of support into the golf club and sought to increase Rennes ‘ production of young endowment by constructing a train center, which was completed in 2000. Pinault besides paid for a completed re-construction of the stadium and besides invested in the transplant grocery store, recruiting several players from South America, most notably Lucas Severino, whom Rennes paid a record €21 million for. The results were immediate in the ten from 2000 to 2010, with Rennes appearing in UEFA-sanctioned european competitions in five of the ten seasons. In young person production, the club produced several young person talents such as Yann M’Vila, Yacine Brahimi, Jimmy Briand and Abdoulaye Diallo, among others. In league competition, Rennes tied its best finish always in the league by finishing fourth in 2004–05. Two seasons late, the club accomplished this feat again. In 2009, Rennes reached the Coupe de France final for the fourth time in its history. In the concluding, Rennes faced Breton rival Guingamp and was the dense favored. Despite taking the lead in the second half, however, Rennes was defeated 2–1 after Guingamp scored two goals in a ten-minute couple. In 2014, Rennes made the Coupe de France final and once again their adversary was Guingamp. In a tense final, Rennes lost the match to their fierce rivals 2–0. [ 6 ] In the 2017–2018 Ligue 1 season, Rennes had one of their best campaigns in late memory finishing 5th and qualifying for the UEFA Europa League. [ 7 ] In 2019, Rennes claimed its one-third Coupe de France win on 27 April. In the concluding, Rennes played Paris St Germain. The french Cup winners for the last four years were heavy favourites to beat Rennes having already been crowned Ligue 1 champions for the 2018–19 season on 21 April. [ 8 ] Rennes rallied binding from two goals down to beat Paris St Germain 6–5 on penalties. [ 9 ] In 2019–20 temper, Rennes finished third gear in Ligue 1 and qualified for 2020–21 UEFA Champions League for the beginning time in their history. [ 10 ]

stadium [edit ]

Hermine symbols outside the Roazhon Park Thesymbols outside the Roazhon Park Rennes has played on the land where the club ‘s stadium, the Roazhon Park, situates itself since 1912. The Roazhon Park, then named Stade de Route de Lorient, which is its address, was constructed in 1912. The facility was inaugurated on 15 September 1912 in a match between Rennes and SA du Lycée de Rennes. The Stade de la Route de Lorient was officially inaugurated a month later when Rennes took on Racing Club de France in front of 3,000 spectators. The Roazhon Park is owned by the city of Rennes and has undergo renovations three times, in 1955, 1983 and 1999. In 1983, the club renovated the stadium in an attempt to resemble the Olympiastadion in Munich. After about four years of renovation, the modern stadium was unveiled on 7 March 1987. In 1999, the newfangled renovations, which were designed by architect Bruno Gaudin, price €37.3 million and took four years to complete. The stadium ‘s inauguration was celebrated doubly : in a match between France and Bosnia and Herzegovina in August 2004, and another football meet contest by Rennes and Metz two months former. The current capacity of the stadium is 29,778. [ 2 ]

train center [edit ]

The entrance to the École Technique Privée Odorico, a part of the Stade Rennais young person academy The Centre d’entraînement Henri-Guérin ( Henri-Guérin Training Center ), colloquially known as La Piverdière, was inaugurated in June 2000. Named for erstwhile club actor and director Henri Guérin, La Piverdière is located on the outskirts of Rennes equitable southwest of Roazhon Park. The center hosts the senior team ‘s training sessions, deoxyadenosine monophosphate well as the club ‘s reserve and young person teams. In 2007, La Piverdière became the home of the club ‘s administrative and business headquarters. Since its origin, La Piverdière has become reputed for its consistent product of young person talent, bringing through players that have become family names at the international level. In that time, the club ‘s youth organization has made up most of the club ‘s inaugural team. current first-team players Eduardo Camavinga and Joris Gnagnon were graduates of the academy. Rennes has been awarded the award of having the best youth academy in France. Rennes has won the Coupe Gambardella, the under-19 national youth rival, three times, in 1973, 2003 and 2008. In 2003, the team that won was anchored by Yoann Gourcuff and Marveaux. Gourcuff went on to win both the UNFP Player of the class and French Player of the year awards and established himself as a french international. Marveaux graduated from the academy after the Gambardella prevail and went on to appear in over 100 matches for Rennes. He had his best season in the 2009–10 season, appearing in 38 matches and scoring 12 goals. In 2008, the team that won the competition was composed of Brahimi, M’Vila, Souprayen, Yohann Lasimant, Quentin Rouger, Kévin Théophile-Catherine, and Damien Le Tallec. Six of the seven players made appearances with the first-team. Le Tallec moved to german club Borussia Dortmund before he could make an appearance .

Supporters [edit ]

Roazhon Celtic Kop at the Roazhon Park. Flares of theat the Roazhon Park.

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Rennes have several athletic supporter groups associated with the club, ranging from groups of aged supporters to ultras. The oldest, most structured and frequented is Allez Rennes. The group was founded in 1962 and together with Les Socios, founded in 1992, is the largest group of traditional supporters. The section of the stadium popularly called Tribune Mordelles is occupied by the Roazhon Celtic Kop ( RCK ). Although the group was founded in 1991, its roots date back to 1987 when a group of supporters known as Ultras Roazhon was formed. The RCK was formed by three young supporters who decided to establish the Mordelles stand as the on-key hot blot of the stadium. [ 11 ] The group marks its presence not only through continuous sing and the use of flares, but besides through numerous tifos and choreographic celebrations. The Breton identity is regularly displayed and the manipulation of Celtic symbols is patronize. [ 12 ] A special feat of the RCK is that the group is responsible for having made the largest Gwenn-ha-du in history measuring 270 square metres. It was displayed at the Mordelles digest during the 1994–95 season. [ 13 ]
The RCK giving court to the deceased former player Jean Prouff in 2008. The RCK functions as an unconditional supporters ‘ group present at all matches, including those at european level, and gathers supporters chiefly of the ultra -mentality, but besides holds on to its values describe by the group as Amitié, Respect et Fête ( Friendship, Respect and Party ). The Kop keeps an outdoors position towards those supporters of Rennes who share them. [ 14 ] The group has taken a strong stead against “ football clientele ”, the inhibition of the ultra -movement [ 15 ] and racism. Although the group is not officially political, it regularly manifests anti-fascism. The RCK is a extremity of the RSRA ( Réseau Supporter de Résistance Antiraciste ), [ 17 ] a french network of football garter groups against racism, and involved in Fare, a european network of football athletic supporter groups against racism and discrimination. [ 18 ] Another major athletic supporter group of the club is the segment Roazhon Pariz. It is a part of the RCK that is situated in Paris. The group supports the team at crucial away matches, such as those against Lyon and Paris Saint-Germain. [ 19 ] The RCK makes no attack to hide its chaotic and gay appearance. In 2003, a second group of ultras, the Breizh Stourmer ( “ Breton Warriors ” ) was formed through a open frame with the RCK. The group was created around the theme of a small, hard core of supporters and chose to situate themselves on the opposite side of the RCK. The Breizh Stourmer has been accused by elements of the RCK for sealed members holding extreme-right views. fierce clashes between radical members of the two groups have occurred. The chief rival of the RCK has, however, not been the Breizh Stourmer, but for many years, the Brigade Loire, a supporters ‘ group of Rennes ‘ rival clubhouse Nantes. The Breizh Stourmer has since dissolved. In 2008, a new group of supporters, the Unvez Kelt ( UK ) ( “ Celtic Unity ” ), was founded. The group was initially refused by the club as an official group, however, with the avail of Les Socios, it was finally accepted. [ 20 ] Failing to establish itself and after several problems, among them a fire that destroyed its premises in November 2010, [ 21 ] clashes with the National Police [ 22 ] and incidents resulting in several of its members becoming arrested during an away meet at Auxerre in 2012, the Unvez Kelt decided to dissolve in 2012. [ 24 ]

Players [edit ]

current team [edit ]

As of 25 September 2021.[25]

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

Out on lend [edit ]

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

go to bed numbers [edit ]

No.

Player

Nationality

Position

Rennes debut

Last match

29[26]

 
Right back
4 November 2006
7 January 2018

celebrated players [edit ]

Below are the noteworthy former and current players who have represented Rennes in league and external contest since the club ‘s foundation garment in 1901. For a complete list of former Stade Rennais F.C. players with a Wikipedia article, see here.

management and coach [edit ]

Club officials[27]
  • President: Jacques Delanoë (interim)
  • Sports Coordinator: Sylvain Armand
Coaching
  • Head coach: Bruno Génésio
  • Assistant coaches: Jean-Marc Kuentz and Mathieu Le Scornet
  • Assistant coach (goalkeeper): Olivier Sorin
  • Youth academy director: Denis Arnaud

Coaching history [edit ]

Coaches since 1906 and later to the accession to professional status in 1932, with the exception of 1939–1941, where the Stade Rennais reverted to amateur status, and 1942–1944, where no coach was appointed by the board, and 1945 where the club didn’t compete in any competition. [ 28 ]

Honours [edit ]

domestic [edit ]

Europe [edit ]

U19 [edit ]

  • Coupe Gambardella
    • Champions (3): 1973, 2003, 2008

References [edit ]

Notes
Bibliography
  • Grant, Jarvie (1999). Sport in the Making of Celtic Cultures (Sport and Nation). Leicester University. ISBN 0-7185-0129-2.
  • Keltz, Benjamin (2012). Supporters du Stade rennais: 100 ans de passion Route de Lorient (in French). Saint-Thonan: Les Éditions du coin de la rue. ISBN 9782954252100.

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สโมสรฟุตบอลทอตนัมฮอตสเปอร์ ( อังกฤษ : Tottenham Hotspur F.C. ) เป็นสโมสรฟุตบอลของ อังกฤษ ปัจจุบันเล่นอยู่ใน พรีเมียร์ลีก รู้จักในนามสั้น ๆ ว่า “ สเปอร์ “ ( Spurs ) ก่อตั้งขึ้นใน ค.ศ. 1882 มีสนามเหย้าคือ สนามกีฬาทอตนัมฮอตสเปอร์ และมีคำขวัญว่า “To dare is to do” ( “ จงกล้าที่จะทำ ” ) สีประจำสโมสรคือเสื้อสีขาวและกางเกงขาสั้นสีน้ำเงินซึ่งใช้มาตั้งแต่ฤดูกาล 1898–99 สเปอร์ชนะเลิศ เอฟเอคัพ สมัยแรกใน ค.ศ. 1901 [ 1 ] ส่งผลให้พวกเขาเป็นสโมสรจากลีกสมัครเล่นเพียงทีมเดียวถึงปัจจุบันที่คว้าแชมป์ได้นับตั้งแต่ สมาคมฟุตบอลอังกฤษ ได้ก่อตั้งระบบการแข่งขันแบบลีกขึ้นใน ค.ศ. 1888 [ 2 ] สเปอร์ยังเป็นสโมสรแรกในศตวรรษที่ 20 ที่ชนะเลิศฟุตบอลลีกและเอฟเอคัพได้ในฤดูกาลเดียวกัน ( ฤดูกาล 1960–61 ) [ 3 ] และยังเป็นสโมสรแรกจากอังกฤษที่ชนะเลิศถ้วยยุโรป ภายหลังชนะเลิศ ยูฟ่าคัพวินเนอร์สคัพ ใน ค.ศ. 1963 รวมทั้งเป็นทีมแรกของอังกฤษที่ชนะเลิศถ้วยยุโรป 2 รายการแตกต่างกัน ภายหลังชนะเลิศ ยูฟ่าคัพ ใน ค.ศ. 1972 สเปอร์ยังเป็นหนึ่งในสองสโมสรของอังกฤษ ( ร่วมกับ แมนเชสเตอร์ ยูไนเต็ด ) ที่ชนะเลิศถ้วยรางวัลได้อย่างน้อย 1 รายการ 6 ทศวรรษติดต่อกัน ( ค.ศ. 1950–2000 ) [ 4 ] ในการแข่งขันในประเทศ สเปอร์ชนะเลิศลีกสูงสุด 2 สมัย, เอฟเอคัพ 8 สมัย, ลีกคัพ 4 สมัย และ เอฟเอคอมมูนิตีชีลด์ 7 สมัย ในการแข่งขันระดับทวีป พวกเขาชนะเลิศยูฟ่าคัพวินเนอร์สคัพ 1 สมัย และ ยูฟ่าคัพ 2 สมัย และเข้าชิงชนะเลิศ ยูฟ่าแชมเปียนส์ลีก ครั้งแรกใน ค.ศ. 2019 สเปอร์มีสโมสรคู่ปรับสำคัญคือ อาร์เซนอล โดยการแข่งขันระหว่างสองทีมเรียกว่า ดาร์บีลอนดอนเหนือ สโมสรมีกลุ่มอีเอ็นไอซีกรุ๊ปบริษัทด้านการลงทุนของอังกฤษเป็นเจ้าของทีมตั้งแต่ ค.ศ. 2001 สเปอร์เป็นสโมสรที่มีมูลค่าทีมสูงเป็นอันดับ 10 ของโลก ด้วยมูลค่า 1.67 พันล้าน ปอนด์ ใน ค.ศ. 2021 [ 5 ] และมีรายรับมากที่สุดเป็นอันดับ 9 ของโลกด้วยรายได้ 390 ล้านปอนด์ใน ค.ศ. 2020 [ 6 ]
ผู้เล่นของสเปอร์ใน ค.ศ. 1885

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สโมสรฟุตบอลทอตนัมฮอตสเปอร์ก่อตั้งขึ้นใน ค.ศ. 1882 โดยกลุ่มเด็กนักเรียนมัธยม 11 คนซึ่งเป็นสมาชิกชมรม คริกเกต นำโดย บ็อบบี บัคเคิล [ 7 ] โดยใช้ชื่อ ฮอตสเปอร์ เอฟซี โดยมีจุดประสงค์เพื่อให้นักเรียนได้ออกกำลังกายในช่วงปิดภาคเรียน หนึ่งปีต่อมา กลุ่มนักเรียนได้ร้องขอให้ จอห์น ริพเชอร์ คุณครูสอน คัมภีร์ไบเบิล ใน โบสถ์ ประจำโรงเรียนเป็นประธานสโมสรคนแรก [ 8 ] โดยริพเชอร์ได้ช่วยเหลือทีมทั้งในเรื่องค่าใช้จ่ายและการฝึกซ้อม [ 9 ] ใน ค.ศ. 1884 สโมสรได้เปลี่ยนชื่อเป็น ท็อตนัมฮอตสเปอร์ เอฟซี เพื่อให้ไม่เกิดความสับสนกับสโมสรอื่น ๆ ในกรุงลอนดอนที่ใช้ชื่อว่าฮอตสเปอร์ [ 10 ] และมีการตั้งชือเล่นสโมสรว่า “ สเปอร์ “ และมีฉายาว่า “ ดอกลิลลี่สีขาว (The Lily Whites) “ [ 11 ] ในช่วงแรกทีมยังไม่ลงแข่งขันระดับทางการโดยมีเพียงการเตะอุ่นเครื่องกับสโมสรท้องถิ่น การแข่งขันอาชีพนัดแรกของสเปอร์คือการพบกับทีมท้องถิ่นชื่อว่า Radicals ซึ่งพวกเขาแพ้ไป 0–2 ต่อมา สเปอร์ได้ร่วมแข่งขันฟุตบอลถ้วยทางการครั้งแรกในถ้วยการกุศลของกรุงลอนดอน ในวันที่ 17 ตุลาคม 1885 เอาชนะทีม เซนต์ อัลบาน ไป 5–2 [ 12 ] ต่อมา สเปอร์ได้จดทะเบียนเป็นสโมสรอาชีพในวันที่ 20 ธันวาคม 1895 และได้ร่วมแข่งขันลีกเป็นครั้งแรกใน เซาเทิร์นฟุตบอลลีก สโมสรมีสนามเหย้าแห่งแรกคือ ทอตนัม มาร์เชส แต่ใน ค.ศ. 1897 สนามได้ถูกระงับการใช้งานอย่างถาวรเนื่องจากเกิดสงคราม โดยสเปอร์ได้เช่าบริเวณย่าน นอททัมเบอร์แลนด์ และขอเช่าสนาม นอททัมเบอร์แลนด์ พาร์ค เป็นเวลา 8 ปี ก่อนที่จะย้ายไปยัง ไวต์ฮาร์ตเลน ในปี 1898 และแต่งตั้ง แฟรงค์ เบรดเทลล์ ชาวอังกฤษ เป็นผู้จัดการทีมคนแรก โดยนักเตะคนแรกที่เบรดเทลล์ซื้อมาร่วมทีมคือ จอห์น คาเมรอน จาก สโมสรควีนส์พาร์ก และในปีนั้น สโมสรได้จดทะเบียนเป็นบริษัทอย่างเป็นทางการ [ 13 ] หลังจากคุมทีมได้ฤดูกาลเดียว เบรดเทลล์ได้ย้ายไปคุม พอร์ตสมัท และผู้ที่มาคุมทีมแทนก็คือ จอห์น คาเมรอน ซึ่งเบรดเทลล์เพิ่งซื้อตัวเขามานั่นเอง ซึ่งคาเมรอนได้เซ็นสัญญาในฐานะผู้เล่น–ผู้จัดการทีม โดยยังลงเล่นให้กับสโมสรในตำแหน่ง กองหน้า คาเมรอนนำสเปอร์คว้าแชมป์เซาเทิร์นฟุตบอลลีกได้ในปี 1900 ตามด้วยแชมป์ เอฟเอคัพ สมัยแรกในปี 1901 โดยเอาชนะ เชฟฟีลด์ยูไนเต็ด ในนัดแข่งใหม่ 3–1 หลังจากเสมอกันในนัดแรก 2–2 [ 14 ] ทำให้สเปอร์เป็นสโมสรจากลีกสมัครเล่นเพียงทีมเดียวจนถึงทุกวันนี้ที่ได้แชมป์เอฟเอคัพ นับตั้งแต่เริ่มมีการนำระบบลีกอาชีพมาใช้ในปี 1888 [ 15 ] คาเมรอนยังพาสเปอร์ได้รองแชมป์ลีกอีก 2 ครั้งในปี 1902 และ 1904 ต่อมา ในปี 1908 คาเมรอนลาออก และเฟรด เคิร์กแฮม เข้ามาคุมทีมต่อ ในปีนั้นสเปอร์ได้ย้ายไปเล่นในดิวิชั่น 2 และได้รองแชมป์ [ 16 ]
อาเทอร์ กริมส์เดล กัปตันทีมของสเปอร์กับถ้วยเอฟเอคัพใน ค.ศ. 1921 ในช่วง ค.ศ. 1912–27 สเปอร์มี ปีเตอร์ แม็ควิลเลียม อดีตนักฟุตบอล ชาวสกอตแลนด์ เป็นผู้จัดการทีม และพวกเขาจบอันดับสุดท้ายในดิวิชั่นหนึ่งฤดูกาล 1914–15 ก่อนที่การแข่งขันฟุตบอลลีกจะหยุดไป 5 ปีเนื่องจากสถานการณ์ สงครามโลกครั้งที่หนึ่ง ต่อมา ฟุตบอลอังกฤษได้กลับมาแข่งขันในฤดูกาล 1919–20 สมาคมฟุตบอลอังกฤษ มีมติเพิ่มจำนวนทีมในลีกสูงสุดจากเดิม 20 ทีม เป็น 22 ทีม โดยให้สิทธิ์ทีมอันดับ 1 และ 2 ในดิวิชั่นสองเลื่อนชั้นขึ้นมาโดยอัตโนมัติ ซึ่งได้แก่ ดาร์บีเคาน์ตี และ เพรสตันนอร์ทเอนด์ และในส่วนของโควตาทีมสุดท้ายนั้น สมาคมได้โหวตเลือก อาร์เซนอล ซึ่งอยู่ในดิวิชั่น 2 เลื่อนชั้นขึ้นมาในลีกสูงสุด และให้สเปอร์ซึ่งได้อันดับ 20 ในดิวิชั่น 1 ฤดูกาลล่าสุดต้องตกชั้นไปเล่นดิวิชั่น 2 แทน แม้สเปอร์จะยื่นเรื่องฟ้องต่อศาลแต่ก็ไม่เป็นผล [ 17 ] แต่สเปอร์ก็เลื่อนขั้นกลับขึ้นมาลีกสูงสุดได้ในเวลาเพียงแค่หนึ่งฤดูกาล ใน ค.ศ. 1921 สเปอร์คว้าแชมป์เอฟเอคัพได้ เอาชนะ วุลเวอร์แฮมป์ตันวอนเดอเรอส์ 1–0 ตามด้วยรองแชมป์ลีกใน ค.ศ. 1922 ทีมมีผู้เล่นชื่อดังในสมัยนั้นคือ อาเทอร์ กริมส์เดล กัปตันทีม แต่หลังจากนั้นพวกเขาเริ่มเข้าสู่ยุคตกต่ำโดยเป็นทีมกลางตารางในอีก 5 ฤดูกาลถัดมา และตกชั้นอีกครั้งในฤดูกาล 1927–28 และแม็คมิลานลาออก ถัดมา ในช่วงทศวรรษ 1930–40 สเปอร์เล่นอยู่ในดิวิชั่น 2 เป็นส่วนมาก ต่อมา ใน ค.ศ. 1949 สโมสรมีผู้จัดการทีมคือ อาเทอร์ โรเวย์ ชาวอังกฤษ ซึ่งเข้ามาปฏิวัติแผนการเล่นของทีมให้เน้นเกมรุกเอาใจแฟน ๆ ด้วยลีลาการเล่นที่เร้าใจ จนได้รับฉายาว่า The “push and run” [ 18 ] โรเวย์พาสเปอร์เลื่อนชั้นกลับสู่ลีกสูงสุดได้อีกครั้งในปี 1950 และคว้าแชมป์ลีกสูงสุดได้เป็นครั้งแรกในฤดูกาล 1950–51 [ 19 ] ก่อนจะลาออกในปี 1955 เนื่องจากปัญหาสุขภาพ
บิล นิโคลสัน ตำนานผู้เล่นของสโมสร [ 20 ] ได้มาคุมทีมใน ค.ศ. 1958 และถือเป็นยุคทองของสโมสร โดยครองแชมป์ดิวิชั่นหนึ่ง 1 สมัย, แชมป์ เอฟเอคัพ 3 สมัย, ลีกคัพ 2 สมัย, เอฟเอคอมมูนิตีชีลด์ 3 สมัย และยังประสบความสำเร็จในรายการยุโรป โดยได้แชมป์ ยูฟ่าคัพ ( ยูโรปาลีกในปัจจุบัน ) 1 สมัย และแชมป์ ยูฟ่าคัพวินเนอร์สคัพ อีก 1 สมัย [ 21 ] และสเปอร์ยังได้ร่วมแข่งขัน ยูโรเปียนคัพ ( ยูฟ่าแชมเปียนส์ลีก ) เป็นครั้งแรกในฤดูกาล 1961–62 แต่นิโคลสันก็ถูกปลดในฤดูกาล 1974–75 หลังจากนั้น สเปอร์ก็ยังเล่นอยู่ในลีกสูงสุดอย่างมั่นคง และในปี 1981–82 สเปอร์เป็นแชมป์ เอฟเอคัพ 2 สมัยติดต่อกันในยุคของ คีธ เบอร์คินชอว์ ตามด้วยแชมป์ ยูฟ่าคัพ สมัยที่ 2 ในปี 1984 โดยเบอร์คินชอว์สร้างทีมด้วยนักเตะแกนหลักอย่าง เกล็น ฮอดเดิ้ล ก่อนจะลาทีมในปี 1984 จากนั้น ปีเตอร์ ชรีฟส์, เดวิด พลีท และ ดัก ลิเวอร์มอร์ เข้ามาคุมทีม แต่ก็ไม่ประสบความสำเร็จ เทอร์รี เวนาเบิลส์ อดีตผู้เล่นของสโมสรเข้ามาคุมทีมในปี 1987 โดยพาสเปอร์คว้าแชมป์เอฟเอคัพและ เอฟเอคอมมูนิตีชีลด์ ได้ในฤดูกาล 1990–91 และเป็นทีมแรกที่ได้แชมป์เอฟเอคัพครบ 8 สมัย นักเตะตัวหลักของทีมในช่วงนั้นได้แก่ พอล แกสคอยน์ และ แกรี่ ลินิเกอร์
ในช่วงปี 1993–2000 สเปอร์คว้าแชมป์เพิ่มได้รายการเดียวคือลีกคัพในฤดูกาล 1998–99 ภายใต้การคุมทีมของ จอร์จ เกรแฮม เอาชนะ เลสเตอร์ซิตี 1–0 ในช่วงนั้นทีมมีผู้เล่นชื่อดังหลายราย เช่น เท็ดดี้ เชอริงแฮม, เยือร์เกิน คลีนส์มัน, คริส อาร์มสตรอง และ ดาวีด ฌีโนลา แต่ผลงานในลีกก็ไม่ดีนักโดยเป็นเพียงทีมกลางตาราง ในทศวรรษถัดมา ทีมยังคงมีผลงานไม่สม่ำเสมอ และเปลี่ยนผู้จัดการทีมหลายคน เช่น เกล็น ฮอดเดิล, เดวิด พลีท, ฌัก ซ็องตีนี และ มาร์ติน โยล ก่อนที่ ฆวนเด รามอส จะเข้ามาคุมทีม และพาทีมได้แชมป์ ลีกคัพ ปี 2008 เอาชนะ เชลซี 2–1 ในช่วงต่อเวลา [ 22 ] แต่ก็ถูกปลดในปีต่อมา [ 23 ] [ 24 ] แฮร์รี เรดแนปป์ เข้ามาคุมทีมต่อในฤดูกาล 2008–09 และพาทีมเข้าชิงชนะเลิศลีกคัพกับ แมนเชสเตอร์ยูไนเต็ด แต่แพ้จุดโทษ [ 25 ] ต่อมาในฤดูกาล 2009–10 สเปอร์ซึ่งมีผู้เล่นตัวหลักอย่าง แกเร็ท เบล และ ลูกา มอดริช จบอันดับ 4 ในลีกได้สิทธิ์แข่งขัน ยูฟ่าแชมเปียนส์ลีก เป็นครั้งแรกนับตั้งแต่ฤดูกาล 1961–62 [ 26 ] [ 27 ] ใน ฤดูกาล 2010–11 สเปอร์ผ่านเข้าถึงรอบ 8 ทีมสุดท้ายยูฟ่าแชมเปียนส์ลีกก่อนจะแพ้ เรอัลมาดริด และเรดแนปป์ได้ลาทีมในปีต่อมาเนื่องจากเจรจาสัญญาฉบับใหม่ไม่ลงตัว [ 28 ] อังแดร วีลัช-โบอัช และ ทิม เชอร์วูด เข้ามาคุมทีมต่อในปี 2012 และ 2013 และพาทีมจบอันดับ 5 และ 6 ได้สิทธิ์แข่งขัน ยูโรปาลีก [ 29 ] เมาริซิโอ โปเชติโน [ 30 ] เข้ามาคุมทีมใน ฤดูกาล 2014–15 และพาทีมจบอันดับ 5 รวมทั้งเข้าชิงชนะเลิศ ลีกคัพ ก่อนจะแพ้เชลซี 0–2 [ 31 ] ในปีต่อ ๆ มา สเปอร์ซึ่งมีกองหน้าคนสำคัญอย่าง แฮร์รี่ เคน ยังคงทำอันดับในลีกได้อย่างยอดเยี่ยม โดยจบอันดับสามใน ฤดูกาล 2015–16 และคว้ารองแชมป์ได้ใน ฤดูกาล 2016–17 ซึ่งเป็นอันดับที่ดีที่สุดนับตั้งแต่ฤดูกาล 1962–63 ในสมัยฟุตบอลดิวิชั่นหนึ่งก่อนจะจบอันดับสามอีกครั้งใน ฤดูกาล 2017–18 และเข้าชิงชนะเลิศยูฟ่าแชมเปียนส์ลีกครั้งแรกใน ฤดูกาล 2018–19 แต่แพ้ ลิเวอร์พูล 0–2 ต่อมา โปเชติโนถูกปลดใน ฤดูกาล 2019–20 โชเซ มูรีนโย เข้ามาคุมทีมต่อ ก่อนจะถูกปลดใน ฤดูกาล 2020–21 แม้จะพาทีมเข้าชิงชนะเลิศ อีเอฟแอลคัพ ได้ [ 32 ] ไรอัน เมสัน อดีตผู้เล่นสโมสรเข้ามารักษาการต่อ แต่ก็พาทีมแพ้ แมนเชสเตอร์ซิตี ในรอบชิงชนะเลิศ อีเอฟแอลคัพ 0–1 ใน ฤดูกาล 2021–22 สเปอร์แต่งตั้ง นูนู อึชปีรีตู ซังตู เป็นผู้จัดการทีม [ 33 ] แต่ก็ถูกปลดหลังคุมทีมได้เพียง 4 เดือน [ 34 ] และ อันโตนีโอ กอนเต เข้ามาคุมทีมต่อ [ 35 ]
ตราสัญลักษณ์ของสโมสรทอตนัมฮอตสเปอร์เป็นรูปไก่ตัวผู้ที่มีเดือยแหลมคมเหยียบลูกฟุตบอล จึงได้ฉายาในภาษาไทยว่า “ไก่เดือยทอง” ตราสัญลักษณ์นี้มีที่มาจากนัดชิงชนะเลิศเอฟเอคัพในปี 1901 เมื่อแฮร์รี เพอร์ซี ฮอตสเปอร์ บุคคลที่เชื่อกันว่าทางสโมสรได้นำนามสกุลของเขาตั้งขึ้นเป็นชื่อสโมสร ใส่รูปไก่ตัวผู้ลงไปในตราสัญลักษณ์เพื่อให้ผู้เล่นเกิดความฮึกเหิม ต่อมาอีก 8 ปี วิลเลียม เจมส์ สก๊อต อดีตผู้เล่นของสโมสรได้ทำรูปหล่อสำริดไก่ตัวผู้เหยียบลูกฟุตบอลขึ้นมา จึงได้กลายมาเป็นสัญลักษณ์ของสโมสรนับตั้งแต่บัดนั้น โดยสัญลักษณ์รูปนี้ได้ทำการปรับเปลี่ยนมาหลายครั้งในหลายยุคสมัย โดยในยุคทศวรรษที่ 1920 เป็นรูปลักษณ์ที่เรียบ ๆ ต่อมาสมัยก็มีรูปลูกโลกรวมถึงสิงโตคู่ ซึ่งเป็นสัญลักษณ์ของตระกูลนอร์ททัมเบอร์แลนด์ของแฮร์รี ฮอตสเปอร์ ทั้งปราสาทบรูซซึ่งตั้งอยู่ใกล้สนามไวท์ฮาร์ทเลน รวมทั้งต้นไม้ 7 ต้น สื่อถึงเซเวนซิสเตอร์ส์ ย่านหนึ่งในลอนดอนเหนือที่ตั้งของสโมสรด้วย พร้อมคติภาษาละตินที่ว่า “Audere Est Facere” (จงกล้าที่จะทำ) ต่อมาในยุคทศวรรษที่ 1980 ได้ตัดรายละเอียดต่าง ๆ ออกไป เหลือเพียงไก่กับสิงโตและคติภาษาละตินเท่านั้น โดยสัญลักษณ์แบบปัจจุบันเกิดขึ้นในปี 2006 [ 36 ]

ในยุคแรก ทอตนัมฮอตสเปอร์มีสนามประจำสโมสรคือ ทอตนัม มาร์เชส แต่เนื่องจากเกิดปัญหาสงครามขึ้นใน ค.ศ. 1897 ทอตนัม มาร์เชส ได้ถูกระงับการใช้งานอย่างถาวร โดยสโมสรได้ไปเช่าบริเวณย่าน นอททัมเบอร์แลนด์ และขอเช่าสนาม นอททัมเบอร์แลนด์ พาร์ค เป็นเวลา 8 ปี ก่อนที่จะย้ายไปยังสนาม ไวต์ฮาร์ตเลน ในปี 1899 [ 37 ] ความจุ 36,230 ที่นั่ง และยังได้รับเลือกให้เป็นสนามฟุตบอลที่สะอาดที่สุดในประเทศอังกฤษ [ 38 ] โดยสนามเป็นพื้นหญ้ายาว 100 เมตร กว้าง 67 เมตร ออกแบบโดยสถาปนิกชื่อ อาชิบัลด์ ลีตช์ ชาวสกอตแลนด์ และสโมสรได้ใช้สนามแห่งนี้จนถึงต้นทศวรรษที่ 2000 ผู้บริหารจึงมีแนวคิดที่จะสร้างสนามแห่งใหม่เพื่อรองรับแฟนบอลที่เพิ่มขึ้น [ 39 ] โดยมีความพยายามที่จะย้ายสนามใหม่ตั้งแต่ปี 2001 โดยจะย้ายไปยังสนามกีฬาในเขตพิคเกตส์ล็อก แต่ไม่ได้รับอนุมัติจากกรุงลอนดอนเนื่องจากสภาพการจราจรที่แออัด รวมถึงแผนการย้ายไปยัง เวมบลีย์ ในปี 2007 แต่ก็ไม่เกิดขึ้น
ในเดือนตุลาคม 2008 สโมสรประกาศแผนการสร้างสนามใหม่ทางทิศเหนือแทนที่ ไวท์ฮาร์ทเลน เนื่องจากต้องการเพิ่มความจุและความทันสมัย โดยทางใต้ของสนามใหม่จะมีเนื่อที่ครึ่งหนึ่งทับซ้อนกันกับทางตอนเหนือของเดอะเลน [ 40 ] โครงการดังกล่าวมีชื่อว่า “นอร์ธัมเบอร์แลนด์” สโมสรเริ่มดำเนินการในเดือนตุลาคม 2009 แต่หลังจากปัญหาต่าง ๆ ทั้งด้านทำเลที่ตั้งและค่าใช้จ่าย สโมสรก็ถูกเพิกถอนโครงการชั่วคราว แต่ผู้บริหารสเปอร์ได้เสนอแผนงานใหม่อีกครั้งโดยมีการเสนอไปที่องค์การอนุรักษ์แห่งอังกฤษ และเลขานุการของรัฐบาล โดย บอริส จอห์นสัน นายกเทศมนตรีกรุงลอนดอนในขณะนั้นได้อนุมัติในวันที่ 25 พฤศจิกายน 2010 ในปี 2011 ระหว่างการดำเนินการโครงการ นอร์ธัมเบอร์แลนด์ ผู้บริหารของสเปอร์มีแนวคิดที่จะย้ายไปยัง สนามกีฬาลอนดอน ซึ่งสร้างขึ้นเพื่อการแข่งขัน โอลิมปิกฤดูร้อน 2012 และในปีเดียวกัน ได้มีการยื่นข้อเสนอขอใช้สนามจากสองสโมสรคือสเปอร์กับ เวสต์แฮมยูไนเต็ด โดยสเปอร์ได้ชนะในการเสนอราคาครั้งแรก แต่ถอนตัวในภายหลังเนื่องจากปัญหาค่าใช้จ่าย ทำให้เวสต์แฮมได้ใช้สนามกีฬาโอลิมปิกลอนดอนแทน ภายหลังจากความล่าช้าต่าง ๆ ในที่สุด การก่อสร้างสนามแห่งใหม่ได้เริ่มขึ้นในปี 2016 และมีกำหนดเปิดในช่วงฤดูกาล 2018–19 และในระหว่างการก่อสร้าง เกมในบ้านของสเปอร์ทั้งหมดในฤดูกาล 2017–18 ได้ย้ายไปเล่นที่ เวมบลีย์ [ 41 ] หลังจากการทดสอบระบบที่ประสบความสำเร็จสองครั้ง สเปอร์ได้ย้ายเข้าสู่สนามใหม่อย่างเป็นทางการเมื่อวันที่ 3 เมษายน 2019 [ 42 ] ในการแข่งขันพรีเมียร์ลีกกับคริสตัลพาเลซ ซึ่งสเปอร์ชนะ 2–0 สนามใหม่นี้มีชื่อว่า สนามกีฬาทอตนัมฮอตสเปอร์ และเป็นบ้านหลังใหม่ของสเปอร์ถึงปัจจุบัน
แฟนบอลสเปอร์ในสนามทอตนัมฮอตสเปอร์สเตเดียมปี 2019 สเปอร์เป็นสโมสรเก่าแก่ที่มีผู้ติดตามมายาวนาน [ 43 ] และมีฐานแฟนคลับที่ใหญ่ใน กรุงลอนดอน [ 44 ] พวกเขาเคยมียอดผู้ชมเกมในสนามเฉลี่ยมากทีสุดในประเทศในช่วงปี 1950–62 และมียอดจำหน่ายบัตรเข้าชมมากที่สุดเป็นอันดับ 9 ของพรีเมียร์ลีกประจำฤดูกาล 2008–09 และสเปอร์เป็นหนึ่งในสโมสรที่มีผู้ติดตามมากที่สุดในโลกจากทุกทวีป แฟนคลับรุ่นบุกเบิกของสโมสรมีชื่อเรียกว่า “ ยิดอาร์มี ” ( Yid Army ) ซึ่งหมายถึง ชาวยิว เนื่องจากแฟนคลับแต่ดั้งเดิมของสโมสรเป็นชาวยิวที่ตั้งรกรากในกรุง ลอนดอน ตอนเหนือ แฟนฟุตบอลที่มีชื่อเสียงของสเปอร์ได้แก่ เจสซี เจ นักร้องชื่อดังชาวอังกฤษ [ 45 ] และ เจ. เค. โรว์ลิง นักเขียนนวนิยาย สเปอร์มีเพลงประจำสโมสรที่แฟน ๆ มักร้องเชียร์ในสนามคือ “Glory Glory Tottenham Hotspur” เริ่มใช้ครั้งแรกในปี 1961 ภายหลังจากที่ทีมคว้าดับเบิลแชมป์ได้ในฤดูกาลดังกล่าว และได้ไปแข่งขันฟุตบอลยุโรปเป็นครั้งแรก
ทอตนัมฮอตสเปอร์ เป็นคู่แข่งโดยตรงกับ อาร์เซนอล ซึ่งตั้งอยู่ในย่านลอนดอนเหนือด้วยกัน โดยการแข่งขันระหว่างสองทีมเรียกว่า ดาร์บีลอนดอนเหนือ โดยมีจุดเริ่มต้นมาจากการย้ายจากลอนดอนใต้ มายังลอนดอนเหนือของอาร์เซนอลใน ค.ศ. 1913 โดยแต่เดิมนั้น สเปอร์เป็นสโมสรเดียวที่ตั้งอยู่ในย่านลอนดอนเหนือ พวกเขาเปรียบเสมือนความภาคภูมิใจและเป็นสโมสรตัวแทนของคนในย่านนี้ การย้ายมาของอาร์เซนอลจึงเปรียบเสมือนการมาแย่งพื้นที่และฐานแฟนคลับของสเปอร์ ยิ่งไปกว่านั้น จากการมีมติเพิ่มจำนวนทีมในลีกสูงสุดจากเดิม 20 ทีม เป็น 22 ทีมในฤดูกาล 1919–20 โดยสมาคมฟุตบอลอังกฤษได้ให้สิทธิ์ทีมอันดับ 1 และ 2 จากดิวิชั่นสองเลื่อนชั้นขึ้นมาโดยอัตโนมัติ ( ดาร์บีเคาน์ตี และ เพรสตันนอร์ทเอนด์ ) และในโควตาทีมสุดท้ายนั้น สมาชิกสมาคมได้โหวตเลือกให้อาร์เซนอลซึ่งอยู่ในดิวิชั่น 2 เลื่อนชั้นขึ้นมาในลีกสูงสุด ( ดิวิชั่น 1 ) และให้สเปอร์ซึ่งได้อันดับ 20 ในดิวิชั่น 1 ตกชั้นไปเล่นดิวิชั่น 2 แทน และเหตุการณ์ครั้งนั้นได้มีการกล่าวหาว่า เฮนรี นอร์ริส ประธานสโมสรอาร์เซนอลในขณะนั้นใช้วิธีวิ่งเต้นและติดสินบนต่อสมาคม แต่ก็ไม่ปรากฏหลักฐานเพียงพอ และนั่นถือเป็นเหตุการณ์สำคัญครั้งประวัติศาสตร์ที่สร้างความโกรธแค้นให้แก่สเปอร์และทำให้ความเป็นอริกันของสองสโมสรทวีความรุนแรงมาจนถึงทุกวันนี้ [ 46 ] สโมสรในลอนดอนอื่น ๆ ที่เป็นคู่แข่งกับสเปอร์ได้แก่ เชลซี และ เวสต์แฮม แต่ความเป็นอริและบรรยากาศการเผชิญหน้ากันไม่ดุเดือดเท่าการพบกับอาร์เซนอล [ 47 ]
ตั้งแต่ปี 2006 สโมสรได้ทำงานร่วมกับ Haringey Council และ Metropolitan Housing Trust และชุมชนท้องถิ่นในการพัฒนาสิ่งอำนวยความสะดวกด้านกีฬาและกิจกรรมทางสังคมซึ่งได้รับการสนับสนุนทางการเงินจาก Barclays Spaces for Sport และ Football Foundation [ 48 ] มูลนิธิทอตนัมฮอตสเปอร์ได้รับการสนับสนุนระดับสูงจาก นายกรัฐมนตรี และเปิดตัวเดือนกุมภาพันธ์ 2007 [ 49 ] ในเดือนมีนาคม 2007 สโมสรได้ประกาศความร่วมมือกับองค์กรการกุศล SOS Children’s Villages UK โดยนำเงินค่าปรับจากผู้เล่นที่ทำผิดวินัยไปช่วยเหลือหมู่บ้านเด็กของมูลนิธิในรัสเตนบูร์ก ประเทศแอฟริกาใต้ รวมทั้งสนับสนุนโครงการพัฒนาชุมชนที่หลากหลายในและรอบ ๆ เมืองรัสเตนบูร์ก ในปีงบประมาณ 2006 และ 2007 สเปอร์ครองอันดับสูงสุดในอังกฤษในด้านการบริจาคเพื่อการกุศล [ 50 ] คิดเป็นมูลค่ากว่า 4,545,889 ปอนด์ ซึ่งรวมถึงการบริจาคเงินอีก 4.5 ล้านปอนด์ตลอดระยะเวลาสี่ปี เพื่อจัดตั้งมูลนิธิทอตนัมฮอตสเปอร์ [ 51 ] สเปอร์ยังเป็นหนึ่งในผู้เข้าร่วมที่มีชื่อเสียงในโครงการ 10:10 ซึ่งสนับสนุนให้บุคคล ธุรกิจ และองค์กรดำเนินการเกี่ยวกับปัญหาสิ่งแวดล้อม พวกเขาเข้าร่วมในปี 2007 ด้วยความมุ่งมั่นในการลดการปล่อย ก๊าซคาร์บอนไดออกไซด์ พวกเขาได้อัพเกรดไฟในสนามเป็นรุ่นที่มีประสิทธิภาพมากขึ้น และหนึ่งปีต่อมา พวกเขารายงานว่าพวกเขาลดการปล่อยคาร์บอนลง 14 % [ 52 ] นอกจากนี้สเปอร์ยังได้ให้เงินสนับสนุนทุนการศึกษาแก่เด็กยากจนในอังกฤษ รวมถึงการสร้างที่อยู่อาศัยให้แก่คนยากไร้ การสร้างโรงเรียนอนุบาล และสนับสนุนการจ้างงานกว่า 3,500 ตำแหน่งซึ่งเป็นส่วนหนึ่งในโครงการ “ นอร์ธัมเบอร์แลนด์ ” ในการพัฒนาสนามเหย้าแห่งใหม่
1 ออราสมาเป็นบริษัทลูกของ ออโตโนมี คอร์ปอเรชัน
2 ฮิวเลตต์-แพคการ์ด เป็นบริษัทแม่ของ ออโตโนมี คอร์ปอเรชัน

ณ วันที่ 31 สิงหาคม 2021[59][60]

หมายเหตุ : ธงชาติที่ปรากฏบ่งบอกให้ทราบว่าผู้เล่นคนนั้นสามารถเล่นให้กับชาติใดตามกฎของ ฟีฟ่า ตามความเหมาะสม เพราะผู้เล่นบางคนอาจถือสองสัญชาติ
หมายเหตุ : ธงชาติที่ปรากฏบ่งบอกให้ทราบว่าผู้เล่นคนนั้นสามารถเล่นให้กับชาติใดตามกฎของ ฟีฟ่า ตามความเหมาะสม เพราะผู้เล่นบางคนอาจถือสองสัญชาติ

  • ข้อมูลล่าสุด: 4 พฤศจิกายน 2021

สำหรับผู้สนับสนุนทอตนัมฮอตสเปอร์ในประเทศไทยที่มีชื่อเสียง ได้แก่ อาทิวราห์ คงมาลัย ( นักร้อง ), อนุวัฒน์ สงวนศักดิ์ภักดี ( นักร้อง ) [ 79 ], ภาคิน คำวิลัยศักดิ์ ( นักร้องและนักแสดง ), เพชร มาร์ ( โปรดิวเซอร์-นักดนตรี-นักแต่งเพลงและพิธีกร ), เกริกฤทธิ์ ทวีกาญจน์ ( นักฟุตบอลทีมชาติไทย ) เป็นต้น
ทีมหญิงของสโมสรท็อตนัมฮอตสเปอร์ก่อตั้งในปี 1985 ในชื่อ ” Broxbourne Ladies “ ก่อนจะเปลี่ยนมาใช้ชื่อ ” Tottenham Hotspur “ ในฤดูกาล 1991–92 และลงเล่นในลีกสมัครเล่นของฟุตบอลหญิงของอังกฤษ (London and South East Women’s Regional Football League) ซึ่งเป็นลีกระดับสี่ ก่อนจะเลื่อนชั้นขึ้นมาในฤดูกาล 2007–08 และในฤดูกาล 2016–17 พวกเธอชนะเลิศการแข่งขันลีก FA Women’s National League South ซึ่งเป็นลีกระดับสาม และได้เลื่อนชั้นขึ้นมาเล่นในระดับสอง (FA Women’s Championship) [ 80 ] ในวันที่ 1 พฤษภาคม 2019 หลังเกมที่เสมอกับแอสตันวิลลา 1–1 ส่งผลให้ทีมได้สิทธิ์เลื่อนชั้นขึ้นสู่ลีกสูงสุดของฟุตบอลหญิงอังกฤษ ( เอฟเอวีเมนส์ซูเปอร์ลีก ) [ 81 ] และในฤดูกาล 2019–20 สโมสรได้เปลี่ยนชื่อเป็น Tottenham Hotspur Women [ 82 ] และในวันที่ 29 มกราคม 2021 สโมสรได้เซ็นสัญญากับ โช โซ-ฮย็อน กัปตันทีมชาติฟุตบอลหญิงเกาหลีใต้ ส่งผลให้สเปอร์เป็นสโมสรแรกที่มีกัปตันทีมชาติจากชาติเดียวกันสองคนทั้งในทีมชายและทีมหญิง ลงเล่นให้สโมสร [ 83 ] โดย ซน ฮึง-มิน ซึ่งเป็นกัปตันทีมชายของ ทีมชาติเกาหลีใต้ ก็เล่นให้กับทีมชายของสเปอร์เช่นกัน

Sevilla FC

This article is about the spanish football golf club. For the early club in Puerto Rico, see Sevilla FC Puerto Rico Association football club in Spain

Football cabaret

Reading: Sevilla FC

Sevilla Fútbol Club ( spanish pronunciation : [ seˈβiʎa ˈfuðβol ˈkluβ ] ), is a spanish professional football club based in Seville, the capital and largest city of the autonomous community of Andalusia, Spain. It plays in spanish football ‘s top flight, La Liga. sevilla at the European level, have won the UEFA Europa League six times, the most of any club. [ 6 ] It is Spain ‘s oldest frolic club entirely devoted to football. [ 7 ] [ 8 ] [ 9 ] [ 10 ] The clubhouse was formed on 25 January 1890, [ 7 ] [ 8 ] [ 9 ] [ 10 ] with the Scottish born Edward Farquharson Johnston as their beginning president. On 14 October 1905, the club ‘s articles of association were registered in the civil Government of Seville under the presidency of the Jerez-born José Luis Gallegos Arnosa. Sevilla FC is besides the most successful cabaret in Andalusia, winning eighteen andalusian Cups, [ 11 ] a national league La Liga title in 1945–46, five Copa del Rey ( 1935, 1939, 1948, 2007 and 2010 ), one spanish Super Cup ( 2007 ), a record six UEFA Cups/UEFA Europa Leagues ( 2006, 2007, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2020 ) and the 2006 UEFA Super Cup. They were besides designated by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics as the World ‘s best club in 2006 and 2007, thus being the first club to achieve this distinction in two straight years. Its young person team Sevilla Atlético, founded in 1958, presently play in Primera División RFEF. The club was once affiliated to a side in Puerto Rico of the same name and their military reserve team, but they dissolved. other clubs related to Sevilla FC include their women ‘s team and former Superleague Formula team. The golf club ‘s home ground is the 43,883-seat Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán Stadium. It is located in the neighborhood of Nervión, Seville, and owes its name to Ramón Sánchez Pizjuan, who was Sevilla FC ‘s president for 17 years .

history [edit ]

foundation to Civil War [edit ]

The rehearse of football was introduced in Seville at the end of the nineteenth hundred by the large british expatriate population in the city, composed by owners or managers of manufacturing companies based in the capital of Andalusia. Sevilla Fútbol Club was founded on 25 January 1890 as Sevilla Foot-ball Club ( in English ). [ 7 ] [ 8 ] [ 9 ] [ 10 ] [ 12 ] [ 13 ] [ 14 ] [ 15 ] Sevilla FC was punctually formed on 25 January 1890 while a group of youthful british, chiefly Scots, along with other young men of spanish origin, celebrated Burns Night in Seville. [ 16 ] The club ‘s initiation document, published on the Dundee Courier’ randomness edition of 17 March 1890 describe in full moon detail the geological formation of the club and how those young founding members decided first to play under Association Rules, second to bear the bible “ football ” within its name and third, to elect their “ office-bearers ”. The follow paragraph is an educe of that article :

Some six weeks ago a few enthusiastic young residents of british lineage met in one of the cafés for the aim of considering a proposal that we should start an Athletic Association, the privation of practice being greatly felt by the majority of us, who are chiefly engaged in mercantile pursuits. After a deal of lecture and limited consumption of little beer, the “ Club de Football de Sevilla ” was punctually formed and office-bearers elected. It was decided we should play Association rules ( … ) We were about half and half spanish and british

Edward F. Johnston, founder, and the first President The club ‘s first president was the Scot Mr. Edward Farquharson Johnston ( Elgin, 14 October 1854 ), who was the british vice-consul in Seville and co-proprietor of the firm MacAndrews & Co., ship-owners with commercial lines between Spain and the UK, one of them being the enchant of Seville oranges. Hugh Maccoll, another scottish young man ( Glasgow, 9 June 1861 ), a marine mastermind who at that time had moved to Seville to work as the technical coach of Portilla White foundry, was their first captain. One of Maccoll ‘s partners in the Portilla White foundry in Seville, Isaias White junior, was the golf club ‘s first secretary. He was the son of an english entrepreneur who founded the aforesaid company, one of the major foundries in Spain at the end of the nineteenth century. In decree to celebrate the foundation of the club, Isaias White sent a letter to Huelva Recreation Club, to invite them to play a football match in Seville. That letter was published by the spanish newspaper La Provincia. The Huelva club accepted the invitation and the meet took place on 8 March 1890, being therefore the first official match always played in Spain. [ 17 ] Sevilla FC won that diachronic peer 2–0, with the first goal in an official match in spanish football history scored by the Seville team musician Ritson. Isaias lived at Calle Bailen 41 [ 18 ] in Seville ( the house distillery exists but has since been renumbered ) making this the first gear home of Sevilla FC. In 1907, Sevilla Balompíe was founded, followed by Betis Football Club in 1909, Recreativo de Sevilla and Español de Sevilla. More clubs were formed as the years passed and more competitive matches were organized between the teams, although Sevilla FC, the oldest club of the city, imposed its domination over the other clubs in this early period . Sevilla Fútbol Club – real Club Recreativo de Huelva ( 1909 ) In 1912, the first Copa de Sevilla was played and won by Sevilla FC. From 1915 to 1940, the Copa Andalucia was organized by the “ Federación Sur ” ( andalusian FA ) and these championships included Sevilla FC, Real Betis Balompié, Recreativo de Huelva, Español de Cádiz and the sporadic engagement of other clubs such as Nacional de Sevilla and Córdoba. The domination of Sevilla was thus discernible that of the 21 Championships of Andalusia played, 18 were won by Sevilla FC, with the three remaining being won by Español de de Cádiz, Recreativo de Huelva and Real Betis Balompié, respectively. In 1917, Sevilla FC participated in the “ Copa de España ” for the first fourth dimension and became the first base andalusian team to reach the final round of the contest. In 1928, when the “ Campeonato Nacional de Liga ” ( National League Championships ) was organized, Sevilla FC was not function of the First Division due to their defeat to Racing de Santander in an elimination game that was set-up to decide which of the two teams would compete in the newly formed league. At the end of the 1933–34 season, Sevilla FC was promoted to the First Division of the “ Campeonato Nacional de Liga. ” In 1935, they were proclaimed “ Campeón de Copa ” ( Cup Champions ) for the first time by defeating Sabadell, repeated in 1939 against Racing de Ferrol and again in 1948 against Celta de Vigo. The clubhouse participated in two other finals, but conceded kill to Athletic Bilbao in 1955 and to Real Madrid in 1962. Sevilla FC remained in the First Division from the 1933–34 season until 1968, when they were relegated to the Second Division, a grade from which they have never further been relegated from .
Sevilla ‘s inaugural crest, displayed on a erstwhile actor ‘s shirt in the baseball club museum. The 1945–46 season was one of high importance in the history of Sevilla, as it marked the first, and to date only, time in which Sevilla FC were League champions. On four other occasions, the club was proclaimed “ subcampeón de Liga ” ( League Runner-up : 1939–40, 1942–43, 1950–51 and 1956–57 ). Including this 2021/22 season, Sevilla has participated 78 times in the First Division and 13 in the Second Division, never dropping below the Second Division. Sevilla has besides participated in four european tournaments, the “ Copa de Europa ” ( european League Winners Cup ) ( 1957–58 ) ; Recopa ( Winners Cup ) ( 1962–63 ) and UEFA Cup on nine occasions ( 1966–67, 1970–71, 1982–83, 1983–84, 1990–91, 1995–96, 2004–05, 2005–06 and 2006–07 ). Sevilla besides participated in the UEFA Champions League in 2007–08. There are more than 400 individuals who presently play for the Sevilla FC arrangement, which includes two semi-professional teams ( in Second Division A – second national class ) and 12 youth teams . Club ball in the museum. sevilla has always counted on having international players within its ranks to aid in the pursuit of trophies. The first of these players were Spencer and Herminio in the 1920s. Juan Arza, an international musician from the 1940s, was proclaimed top scorer of the spanish League in the 1954–55 temper, with 29 goals. About 30 sevilla players have been chosen to play for the Spain home football team over the years. Foreign players have constantly played an built-in part in the success of Sevilla FC with Diego Maradona representing the most well known among them during his spell with the club during the 1992–93 temper. During the same season, Sevilla FC was managed by Carlos Salvador Bilardo, a earth champion coach. historically, Sevilla FC has fielded teams in a variety of other sports including : basketball, rugby, row, athletics, and weightlifting or petanca. presently, Sevilla FC counts twenty-five professional teams on its ledgers ( one of these being in the second national category ) and a women ‘s football team in the Honor Division. Sevilla FC ‘s stadium, the Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán, was inaugurated in 1958 and is one of the largest stadiums in Spain, and has the honor of hosting a World Cup semi-final equal in 1982. After its final completion, the stadium had a maximum capacity of 75,000 spectators, but since its latest remodelling, the stadium has been converted to an all-seat with a covering added to the independent seating area, reducing the capacity to its stream count of 45,000 spectators .

First successes [edit ]

shackle issue to build the modern stadium ( 1957 ) Ramón Sánchez-Pizjuán ‘s raid placed at the stadium. sevilla had their first spell of home achiever in the ten following the end of the Civil War, winning the 1945–46 La Liga championship and two Copa del Rey titles. In the first season of this ( 1939–40 ), Sevilla won the cup on 25 June, beating Racing de Ferrol 6–2 in Barcelona. [ 19 ] That same season, the slope lost the Liga title on the last day to Atlético Madrid after drawing 3–3 against Hércules. [ 20 ] The Sevilla forward telephone line was known as los stukas after the german bomber aircraft, and scored 216 goals over four seasons. It comprised López, Torrontegui, Campanal, Raimundo, Berrocal and Pepillo. [ 14 ] [ 21 ] In 1941, President Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán left the club to manage the spanish Football Federation. After his passing, Antonio Sánchez Ramos occupied temporarily occupied the placement until the permanent wave appointment of Jerónimo Domínguez y Pérez de Vargas, Marquess of Contadero, who was president of the cabaret for six years until the revert of Sánchez Pizjuán. [ 22 ] Sevilla was runner-up to Athletic Bilbao in the 1942–43 season and came third gear a season late. Sevilla won its only Liga title in 1945–46, edging FC Barcelona by one luff. [ 23 ] Two years later, Sevilla won the 1948 Copa del Rey after beating Celta de Vigo 4–1 in Madrid on 4 July. [ 19 ] The most significant sign of those years was the spanish international striker Juan Arza. There was besides the introduction of the Campanal ‘s nephew, defender Campanal II, with his uncle as a trainer. During the 1950–51 temper, with Campanal acting as the coach, the team finished runner-up in La Liga, two points behind Atlético Madrid. [ 24 ] Before the 1953–54 season, Argentinean coach Helenio Herrera was hired. During his time in charge, the club came fifth in the 1953–54 season, fourthly in both 1954–55 and 1955–56 and moment to Real Madrid in 1956–57. [ 24 ] In 1954, the club put the construction of the new stadium out to tender because Nervión Stadium was becoming besides small for the baseball club ‘s fanbase. In the 1954–55 season, Arza won the Pichichi Trophy as La Liga ‘s circus tent scorekeeper, with 28 goals, [ 25 ] and the team was runner-up in the Copa del Rey. In 1955, for the baseball club ‘s fiftieth anniversary, a trilateral tournament was organized against the french baseball club Stade de Reims and the swedish club IFK Norrköping ; Sevilla won. On 28 October 1956, President Sánchez Pizjuán abruptly died. As an appreciation to the dead person leader under whose chairmanship Sevilla had won three Copas del Rey, the fans decided that the club ‘s planned new stadium was to be named in his respect. [ 26 ] In the 1956–57 season, the team were Liga runner-up behind real Madrid, ensuring qualification for the first clock to the european Cup. Herrera left the club at the conclusion of the season. [ 27 ] The cabaret needed a victory on the final day of the future season to avoid relegation but reached the quarterfinals of the european Cup before being knocked out by holders and eventual champions real Madrid. After the death of the President, Ramón de Carranza assumed the position for four years. It is said that he spoke these words at Sánchez Pizjuán ‘s grave : “Dear Ramón, now your friends, among who I am honored to be one, is going to give you Christian burial, and on the following day, giving your body to the ground, we will start working and your dream that the Sevilla FC has a grand stadium will become a reality. Ramón, go in peace to heaven because your wishes will be fulfilled.” Being true to his words, Carranza made obligation bonds amounting to 50 million pesetas, and a month-and-a-half after Sánchez Pizjuán ‘s death, the first base stone in the stadium ‘s structure was placed. The architect was Manuel Muñoz Monasterio, co-designer of the recently built Santiago Bernabéu Stadium, the home of Real Madrid. The Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán Stadium was ultimately opened on 7 September 1958 as Sevilla played an inaugural friendly against boyfriend andalusian club Real Jaén. The stadium ‘s first official match was on the orifice day of the 1958–59 season, where Sevilla beat cross-city Real Betis 4–2. [ 28 ]

crisis and stability [edit ]

Campanal clearing a ball in the Sánchez Pizjuán Stadium on 15 November 1961. In the 1970s, Sevilla was forced into selling its top players in order to pay off debts incurred from the construction of its new stadium ; Manuel Ruiz Sosa transferred to Atlético Madrid, Gallego to Barcelona and Juan Batista Agüero to Real Madrid. furthermore, separate of the adjacent land to the stadium was besides sold to a bank. In the 1967–68 season, Sevilla returned to the Second Division for the foremost clock in 31 years but was promoted back after one season. The following season, austrian passenger car Max Merkel, nicknamed “ Mr. Whip ” for his usage of severe and harsh discipline techniques and educate, was hired. [ 29 ] That season, the baseball club finished third gear in the league. however, the clubhouse was relegated again at the end of the 1972–73 season. In 1973, Sevilla signed their first-ever black musician, gambian winger Biri Biri, from the danish clubhouse Boldklubben 1901. He remained at the clubhouse until 1978 and became a cult calculate, with an extremist group named after him surviving to this day. In the 1974–75 season, with the Argentine Roque Olsen in charge, the club returned to the First Division. In the late 1970s, Sevilla signed Argentinians such as Héctor Scotta and Daniel Bertoni. [ 30 ] [ 31 ] On 16 May 1976, Sevilla played its 1,000th game in La Liga. Directed first by Miguel Muñoz and subsequently by Manolo Cardo, the team participated in two straight seasons of the UEFA Cup from 1981 to 1983. The seventy-fifth anniversary of the baseball club was celebrated with a assortment of social events and a match against the brazilian slope Santos. In 1982, the World Cup was held in Spain and Sevilla ‘s Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán was the venue for the semi-final match between West Germany and France. [ 32 ] In 1984, Eugenio Montes Cabeza finished his 11-year presidency and was replaced by the cattle businessman Gabriel Rojas, who as the vice-president had made several advancements to the golf club ‘s stadium. In the 1985–86 season, Manolo Cardo left his management position after five years in cathexis, while Francisco played in the 1986 FIFA World Cup for Spain. Vicente Cantatore led the club to UEFA Cup reservation at the end of the 1989–90 temper, with austrian forward Toni Polster scoring a club-record 33 Liga goals. [ 14 ] [ 33 ] In the 1992–93 season, after several months of negotiations, world-renowned Argentine Diego Maradona signed from Napoli for a tip of $ 7.5 million. His time at the clubhouse, however, was unsuccessful, and he was released in large function due to his periodic injuries and clashes with coach Bilardo. [ 34 ] In the follow seasons, Luis Aragonés became director and finished the 1994–95 season with qualification to future season ‘s UEFA Cup. At the end of the 1994–95 season, despite the pleas of the club ‘s directors, Sevilla, along with Celta de Vigo, were one of two clubs relegated from the top flight on reasons of administration, provoking action from fans. The action resulted in both Sevilla and Celta being reinstated to La Liga. [ 35 ] These events led to an institutional instability, with the season seeing four presidents and three managers take charge. Sevilla was relegated at the end of the 1996–97 temper but returned in 1999. [ 36 ] At the beginning of the twenty-first century, the presidency of the club was assumed by the democratic Roberto Alés. [ 37 ] The situation of the cabaret was very delicate at the time ; the team had dropped spinal column to the Second Division in 2000 and the police squad was weakened by musician retirements and the sales of key players. The club opted for a relatively strange trainer, Joaquín Caparrós, who helped the team win the Second Division with three matches to spare in equitable his beginning season at the helm. [ 38 ]

Successes in the twenty-first century [edit ]

In May 2002, Roberto Alés resigned as president of the united states, and the Sevillian lawyer José María del Nido assumed the presidency. One of his first gear decisions was to confirm Caparrós as a bus and Monchi as sporting film director .
On 6 October 2002, before a Seville bowler hat against Betis at the Sánchez Pizjuán, four sevilla fans, including a minor, assaulted a security guard. The approach was punished by Sevilla being forced to play their next four home matches behind close doors, the longest term ever given to a La Liga side. The clubhouse finished in UEFA Europa Cup positions in both the 2003–04 and 2004–05 seasons before marking their centennial in late 2005. This set up Sevilla ‘s first-ever european gloat, the 2006 UEFA Cup Final at the Philips Stadion in Eindhoven on 10 May 2006. The club defeated the English club Middlesbrough 4–0 under new coach Juande Ramos, with the marking opened by brazilian striker Luís Fabiano. In the second-half, italian ersatz Enzo Maresca scored twice to be named Man of the Match, where malian hitter Frédéric Kanouté finished the score. [ 39 ] sevilla opened their 2006–07 season by winning the 2006 UEFA Super Cup on 25 August 2006 with a 3–0 victory over Champions League winners and compatriots Barcelona at the Stade Louis II in Monaco. The goals were scored by Renato, Kanouté and a deep penalty by Maresca. [ 40 ] The season ended with a second consecutive UEFA Cup acquire, this time against companion spanish baseball club Espanyol at Hampden Park, Glasgow. [ 41 ] The equal went to penalties after finishing 2–2 after extra-time, with Sevilla goalkeeper Andrés Palop saving three of Espanyol ‘s penalties. On 12 November 2006, Sevilla played its 2,000th game in La Liga. In addition, Sevilla defeated Getafe in the 2007 Copa del Rey Final, with Kanouté scoring the only goal in the game ‘s 11th moment. Sevilla finished third base in that season ‘s La Liga to qualify for the 2007–08 Champions League. As a leave of these successes, Sevilla was voted as the IFFHS Team of the year for the second straight season, becoming the first base club to achieve this. [ 42 ] Sevilla won the 2007 Supercopa de España against La Liga champions Real Madrid. [ 43 ] The temper started to derail, however, after defender Antonio Puerta suffered a heart attack in the first crippled of the temper and died three days late on 28 August. Three days after his death, Sevilla then lost 3–1 to Milan in the 2007 UEFA Super Cup in Monaco. [ 44 ] Juande Ramos, the individual largely creditworthy for Sevilla ‘s late successes, resigned as director on 27 October to take the post with Tottenham Hotspur ; he was replaced by Sevilla Atlético coach Manolo Jiménez. [ 45 ] In cattiness of the personnel issues, Sevilla however advanced in first place in its Champions League group ahead of Arsenal before late being eliminated in the round of 16 via penalties to Fenerbahçe of Turkey .
The team in 2010 In the summer of 2008, before Jiménez ‘s debut season as first-team coach, Dani Alves and Seydou Keita were both sold to Barcelona, while christian Poulsen left for Juventus. Sevilla finished third base in La Liga with a cabaret record-equalling 21 victories and a club record count of away victories. The 2009–10 season saw a third-consecutive qualification to the Champions League. On 19 May 2010, Sevilla defeated Atlético Madrid 2–0 in the 2010 Copa del Rey Final at Camp Nou, with goals from Diego Capel and Jesús Navas. [ 46 ] [ 47 ] Before the 2010–11 temper started, Sevilla lost to Barcelona 5–3 on aggregate in the Supercopa and were eliminated in the Champions League playoffs by Braga of Portugal .

two-toed sloth Emery era [edit ]

On 14 January of the keep up year, after a 0–2 away loss to Valencia CF that left the Andalusians in 12th invest, Jiménez was relieved of his duties, and was replaced by spanish coach Unai Emery. The golf club went through an organizational fiscal crisis and was forced to sell team stars Álvaro Negredo and Jesús Navas, transactions that gave the club a combined €40 million ; the duet was replaced by a contingent of younger players including strikers Carlos Bacca and Kevin Gameiro. On 14 May 2014, Sevilla defeated Benfica on penalties in the 2014 UEFA Europa League Final to claim their third base victory in the rival. [ 48 ] After this season the identify midfielder Ivan Rakitić was sold to Barcelona for around €16 million ( the deal was closed on 16 June 2014 [ 49 ] ). In the summer 2015 acme scorer Carlos Bacca, who had only joined two years previous, moved to Milan for €30 million. [ 50 ] Despite this, the club acquired players Grzegorz Krychowiak and Éver Banega to reinforce the squad. On 27 May 2015, Sevilla repeated as Europa League champions after defeating ukrainian club Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk 3–2 in the 2015 Final. [ 51 ] The goals for Sevilla were scored by Grzegorz Krychowiak and a brace from Carlos Bacca. [ 52 ] In defeating Dnipro, they became the lone club to have won the Europa League four times. [ 53 ] The club returned to the Europa League final for a third straight clock time, facing Liverpool in the 2016 Final. After being down 1–0 at half-time, Sevilla bounced back in the irregular half to finally win 1–3, with one goal scored from Kevin Gameiro and two from golf club captain Coke. With the one-third consecutive Europa League title, Sevilla improved their record of most Europa League titles won, having lifted the trophy five times in the bridge of ten-spot years. [ 54 ]

Post-Emery era [edit ]

Despite Sevilla ‘s continue achiever in the Europa League, the 2015–16 season proved to be another stopping point outside the top four, the side end in one-seventh. In response, Castro decided to engineer a resurrection of the club. Jorge Sampaoli was hired as director – replacing Paris Saint-Germain -bound Unai Emery [ 55 ] – and the club began to invest heavily that summer. Additions to the english included goalkeeper Salvatore Sirigu on loanword, [ 56 ] playmaker Ganso, forwards Luciano Vietto and Wissam Ben Yedder, attacker Franco Vázquez, wide midfielders Hiroshi Kiyotake and Pablo Sarabia, a well as former Arsenal and Manchester City player Samir Nasri on lend. [ 57 ] In December of the 2017–18 La Liga, Vincenzo Montella was named as the third coach since Emery ‘s deviation in 2016 replacing Eduardo Berizzo. [ 58 ] In the 2017–18 UEFA Champions League season, Sevilla progressed into the hard stages of the competition, and defeated Manchester United in the Round of 16, [ 59 ] reaching the quarter-finals of the competition for the inaugural time in 60 years, though they ultimately lost to Bayern Munich 2-1 on aggregate in the quarter-finals. [ 60 ] On 4 June 2019, Sevilla announced the sign of Julen Lopetegui as coach for the next three seasons. [ 61 ] On 16 August 2020, Sevilla won 2–1 over Manchester United in the semi-finals of the 2019–20 UEFA Europa League, [ 62 ] en route to lifting the trophy for a record one-sixth prison term, beating Inter Milan 3–2 in the final. [ 63 ] Sevilla are presently the most successful club in the UEFA Europa League contest, having won the competition six times, more than any other team. [ 64 ]

Board and finances [edit ]

presidency [edit ]

sevilla is governed by a presidential management system, but with a circuit board of directors that discusses and approves those crucial decisions that must be carried out. The president of the united states is supported by a general director and a sports director. [ 12 ]

Read more: Swansea City A.F.C.

Throughout its history, Sevilla has had 28 presidents, [ 65 ] the first base being Edward Farquharson Johnston, a Scotsman. Those who have occupied the presidency for the longest periods have been Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán, Eugenio Montes Cabezas, José María del Nido Benavente, Luis Cuervas Vilches and José Castro Carmona. In 1992, Sevilla FC became a Sporting Limited Association, following the entrance into force of the law that regulated this kind of sporting companies, and consequently the system of election of the president was amended from being elected by the members to be elected by the shareholders of the cabaret.

ownership [edit ]

  • Sevillistas de Nervion S.A. (Jose Maria del Nido, Roberto Alés, José Castro, José Martín Baena, Francisco Guijarro, and José Gómez Miñán)
  • Rafael Carrión Moreno
  • 777 Partners[66]
  • Accionistas Unidos (Supporters’ Trust / Minor shareholders)

Symbols [edit ]

Anthems [edit ]

El Arrebato, writer and interpreter of the Centennial Anthem . Sevilla FC shield mosaic located on the chief façade of the Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán Stadium. sevilla has two official anthems :

  • Official Anthem of Sevilla FC: This anthem dates back to the year 1983. The lyrics were written by Ángel Luis Osquiguilea de Roncales and the music was composed by Manuel Osquiguilea de Roncales.
  • Centennial Anthem of Sevilla FC: Composed in 2005 by singer Javier Labandón ‘El Arrebato’ to commemorate the centenary of the registration of the club’s articles of association, it became Spain’s number one single and the best-selling anthem of a football club in the entire history of Spanish football, reaching the 2nd position of the best-selling albums in 2006.[67] On 9 October 2006, in the Estadio Ramón Sánchez-Pizjuán, ‘El Arrebato’ was awarded the golden record his anthem.

peak [edit ]

From its foundation, the team used a double-circled crest. On the outside circle, the name of the club and the date of its foundation were written, while in the interior r-2 on a white background the letters “ SFC ” were interlaced as they are on the current cap. This first crest was designed by Juan Lafita, who was a cheeseparing consort of the club and was the son of the Sevillian painter José Lafita y Blanco. The second gear cap was designed in 1922 by Pablo Rodríguez Blanco, a draftsman of the Water Company. He divided the carapace in three parts and together they formed the silhouette of a affection. The three figures that appear are the christian saints portrayed on the coat of arms of the city— Isidore of Seville, Ferdinand III of Castile and Leander of Seville. On the right slope appear the initials “ SFC, ” which were on the official harbor from 1905 to 1922. [ 68 ] Where the three parts meet, a football of the era appears. Regarding the red and white stripes, there are assorted theories, but it seems that the most coherent is that from the first time, the club wished that the official kit out would be loss and white. Another translation indicates that the lower separate is inspired on the pin which King Ferdinand III of Castile carried in the reconquest of Seville in 1248. [ 12 ]

flag [edit ]

The definition of Sevilla ‘s flag is in the articles of affiliation of 1982, which is a alteration of the erstwhile ones which were formed and deposited in the Record of Associations and Sports Federations of the Higher Council of Sports. Its title 1, article 6 states that this is a classifiable emblem of the clubhouse :

The flag, which will be rectangular, divided by a diagonal line that goes from the lower left angle to the upper right angle, which divides it into two triangles, the superior is white and the inferior red.

Kit [edit ]

Sevilla wore shirts with a presenter logo for the beginning time in the 1986–87 temper, to promote the Seville Expo ’92. previously, before the 1980–81 season, the club signed its first kit-manufacturer bargain with the german fast Adidas. Since 2018 the kit is manufactured by Nike .

Media [edit ]

SFC Radio studio in the Sánchez Pizjuán Stadium. sevilla have several media outlets. Its radio receiver station, SFC Radio, launched in September 2004, broadcasts all day on FM and on-line, while its television channel SFC television aired for the first clock in the 2005–06 season with a UEFA Cup match against Zenit Saint Petersburg. Since 8 June 2009, the television coverage has been shown on the cabaret web site. Sevilla topic a physical and digital newspaper the day after every match and on the lapp day as an authoritative one, vitamin a well as a magazine before home games. The official cartridge holder of the club is released every two months, the first offspring being unblock and issued at a friendly against the Brazil national team to mark the clubhouse ‘s centennial in September 2005 .

Players [edit ]

For a list of all former and current Sevilla FC players with a Wikipedia article, see class : sevilla FC footballers

current team [edit ]

As of 19 September 2021.[69]

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

other players under compress [edit ]

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

Reserve police squad [edit ]

note : Flags indicate home team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

Out on loanword [edit ]

eminence : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

current technical staff [edit ]

As of 10 June 2020.[70]

early coaches [edit ]

see also Category:Sevilla FC managers

Facilities [edit ]

stadium [edit ]

The Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán Stadium . The Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán Stadium. In their first fifty years Sevilla played their home matches in versatile locations around Seville : [ 71 ] la Trinidad Field, the Mercantile Field, ‘La Victoria ‘ stadium and the Estadio de Nervión. The Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán Stadium was first planned in 1937 when the land was bought near to the then-home of Sevilla, in Nervión, and construction began in 1954. A contest was held for its design, won by the architect Manuel Muñoz Monasterio, who had besides designed the home of Real Madrid, the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium. The construction of the stadium was completed in the summer of 1958 and was inaugurated on 7 September of the lapp year with a friendly equal against Real Jaén. The east and west grandstands to the stadium were finished in 1974 under the presidency of Eugenio Montes Cabezas and increased the stadium ‘s capacity to 70,000. The visor, the mosaic on the main façade ( by Santiago del Campo ) and the new light were added for the 1982 FIFA World Cup, in which it held a group game between the Soviet Union and Brazil, ampere well as a semi-final between France and West Germany. [ 72 ] The 1986 european Cup Final was held in the stadium, and won by Steaua București against Barcelona. [ 73 ] In addition, the capacity of the stadium was reduced to approximately 60,000. The survive modification was made during the mid-1990s, when according to FIFA rules, all standing areas were redeveloped into seat, reducing the capacitance to the stage 42,714. The Spain home team have played 26 matches in the stadium since 1961, unbeaten with 21 wins and 5 draws. [ 74 ] To mark the club ‘s centennial in 2005, an allegorical mosaic designed by Ben Yessef was built above the southerly gate, depicting the history of the city of Seville. Above it, the club ‘s badge floated in the tip. [ 12 ] [ 75 ] The stadium presently houses the headquarters of the club ‘s media, equally well as an official store, golf club museum and trophy cabinet .

discipline facilities [edit ]

The sporting facilities known as La Ciudad Deportiva ( The Sporting City ) are used by the first team for trail and by the reservation teams and women for matches. These facilities were inaugurated in 1974 and are located on the outskirts of the city on the road to Utrera. It has four natural denounce pitches and three artificial pitches, american samoa well as an artificial pitch for the Antonio Puerta Football School, changing rooms, gymnasium, press room, cafeteria, medical center and a recover room. [ 76 ]

league record [edit ]

Season to season [edit ]

  • 78 seasons in La Liga
  • 13 seasons in Segunda División

Since the club was beginning promoted to La Liga in the 1934–35 temper, Sevilla has played all but seven seasons in the first part. Sevilla won La Liga in the 1945–46 season, and finished as runner-up four times ( 1939–40, 1942–43, 1950–51 and 1956–57 ). While the club has alone suffered four ephemeral descents to the Segunda División, it won the second class entitle in 1968–69 and 2000–01. [ 77 ]

european rival read [edit ]

  • 1 Group stage. Highest-ranked eliminated team in case of qualification, lowest-ranked qualified team in case of elimination.

UEFA baseball club coefficient ranking [edit ]

As of 17 February 2021[78]

Honours [edit ]

2006 IFFHS trophy as best football team in the world. Throughout its history, Sevilla has won trophies at the regional, national and european level – including a record six UEFA Cups/UEFA Europa Leagues — and is the most successful club in Andalusia. [ 79 ] In 2010 Sevilla was given permanent wave possession of the Copa del Rey after their victory in the competition to celebrate Spain winning the 2010 FIFA World Cup. [ 80 ]

National tournaments [edit ]

Winners (1): 2007
Runners-up (3): 2010, 2016, 2018

european tournaments [edit ]

Winners (1): 2006
Runners-up (5): 2007, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2020

regional tournaments [edit ]

  • Copa Andalucía
Winners (18): 1916–17, 1918–19, 1919–20, 1920–21, 1921–22, 1922–23, 1923–24, 1924–25, 1925–26, 1926–27, 1928–29, 1929–30, 1930–31, 1931–32, 1932–33, 1935–36, 1938–39, 1939–40

friendly tournaments [edit ]

Winners (6): 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2017, 2019
Winners (6): 1955, 1956, 1957, 2004, 2008, 2009
Winners (2): 1964, 2004
  • Achille & Cesare Bortolotti Trophy
Winners (1): 2010
  • Ciudad de la Línea Trophy
Winners (3): 2001, 2002, 2003
Winners (4): 1946, 1954, 1960, 2011
Winners (4): 1975, 1985, 1996, 2005

Winners ( 3 ) : 1967, 1991, 1997

  • City of Seville Trophy
Winners (7): 1972, 1973, 1976, 1978, 1982, 1984, 1994
Winners (1): 2008
  • Trofeo de la Sal
Winners (1): 2010
  • Antonio Camacho Memorial
Winners (1): 2012
  • Costa Brava Trophy
Winners (1): 2012
Winners (1): 2016

early awards, records, and recognitions [edit ]

individual trophies [edit ]

team records [edit ]

  • As of 2020–21 season.

General information [edit ]

Details[12][5]

Concept

Times

Seasons in La Liga

77

Seasons in Segunda División

13

Promotions to La Liga

5

Participations in the Copa del Rey

89

Participations in UEFA competitions

24

All-time position in La Liga

6th

Number of international players contributed to the Spain national team

37

Most goals scored in a league match [edit ]

Most goals conceded in a league match [edit ]

Most goals conceded in a league match

Match
Score
Season

Sevilla – Oviedo

0–5

1942–43

Sevilla – Real Madrid

0–5

1962–63

Valencia – Sevilla

8–0

1943–44

Real Madrid – Sevilla

8–0

1958–59

Espanyol – Sevilla

5–1

1986–87

Zaragoza – Sevilla

8–1

1987–88

Real Madrid – Sevilla

5–2

1989–90

Real Madrid – Sevilla

7–0

1990–91

Real Madrid – Sevilla

5–0

1992–93

Barcelona – Sevilla

5–2

1993–94

Deportivo La Coruña – Sevilla

5–1

1994–95

Deportivo La Coruña – Sevilla

5–2

1999–2000

Real Madrid – Sevilla

5–1

2003–04

Espanyol – Sevilla

5–0

2005–06

Barcelona – Sevilla

5–0

2010–11

Getafe – Sevilla

5–1

2011–12

Sevilla – Real Madrid

2–6

2010–11

Sevilla – Real Madrid

2–6

2011–12

Real Madrid – Sevilla

7–3

2013–14

Barcelona – Sevilla

5–1

2014–15

Real Madrid – Sevilla

5–0

2017–18

Eibar – Sevilla

5–1

2017–18

Sevilla – Atlético Madrid

2–5

2017–18

Statistics in UEFA competitions [edit ]

The debut of Sevilla in european competitions took topographic point in the 1957–58 temper as a player in that season ‘s european Cup. Despite finishing runner-up in the league to Real Madrid, Sevilla represented Spain in the rival as Real had already qualified by winning the european Cup the season before. [ 86 ]

Accurate as of 9 March 2021

Pld = Matches played ; W = Won ; D = Drawn ; L = Lost ; GF = Goals for ; GA = Goals against ; GD = Goal deviation

player records [edit ]

Top scorers in the history of the club
Most official appearances [ citation needed ]
Jesús Navas has played the most matches for Sevilla in all competitions, with 522.

affiliate teams [edit ]

Sevilla ‘s B team, Sevilla Atlético, was founded in 1958 and presently plays in Segunda, the second tier of spanish football. Graduates from it to Sevilla ‘s foremost team include Sergio Ramos and Jesús Navas, members of the Spain police squad which won the 2010 World Cup and UEFA Euro 2012. Sevilla FC C, founded in 2003, compete in the one-fourth tier of spanish football, the Tercera División, having risen with four back-to-back promotions from provincial and regional leagues. Sevilla ‘s women ‘s team play in the top-flight of spanish women ‘s football, the Super Liga, and presently play their home games at the club ‘s train ground, Ciudad Deportiva José Ramón Cisneros Palacios. Sevilla acquired the women ‘s clubhouse from certificate of deposit Hispalis in 2004, and the baseball club had its greatest success in the 2005–06 season, when it came runner-up in the Super Liga and the national cup. Since its initiation for the 2007–08 season, the spanish indoor football league has included a Sevilla veterans ‘ team. Sevilla FC Puerto Rico, of Juncos, is a Puerto Rican football cabaret of the Puerto Rico Soccer League. The side affiliated to Sevilla in 2008, and share a like badge and kit. Since 2008, Sevilla has been one of two spanish clubs ( the early being Atlético Madrid, to compete in Superleague Formula, in which cars endorsed by professional football clubs compete in races across the world. The Sevilla-Betis regatta is an annual rowing contest in Seville ‘s Guadalquivir river, held since 1960. different categories of boats represent Sevilla and its cross-city rival Real Betis. Sevilla have won on 30 of the 47 regattas .

support [edit ]

Fans [edit ]

In 2007, Sevilla was the eighth-most supported club in Spain with 2.3 % of the nation ‘s football fans ( compared to 32.8 % for the most popular, Real Madrid ). Their city rivals Real Betis own 3.3 % of the nation ‘s support. Since Sevilla became Sporting Limited Association, the concept of membership disappeared. only the shareholders can take share in the decisions of the club according to the percentage of the das kapital they hold. The minority shareholders of the club are organised in a confederation that represents them in the General Meeting of Shareholders that the club celebrates every year. People who are traditionally referred to as members are presently fans who purchase a annual temper ticket which allows them to attend all home matches that season. Sometimes these members enjoy some specific advantages over the perch of the fans .

fan clubs [edit ]

Sevilla ‘s winnow clubs are chiefly concentrated in the city of Seville, its province and the rest of Andalusia. The bearing of fan clubs in other autonomous communities is greater in Catalonia and Extremadura. Most of them are integrated into the “ San Fernando Fan Clubs Federation ” ( Federación de Peñas Sevillistas “ San Fernando ” ), which, according to its statutes, is wholly independent from the directing display panel of the club, having its own circuit board and not being intervened .

Ultras [edit ]

Biris Norte ‘s streamer at the Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán Stadium. The Biris Norte is an organized group of extremist supporters located in the North grandstand of the Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán. The group ‘s name comes from the Gambian player Alhaji Momodo Njie, nicknamed Biri Biri, who became identical democratic amongst the Sevilla fans in the 1970s. The “ Biris Norte ” was created in the 1974–75 and is one of the oldest groups of Ultra fans in Spain .

Rivalries [edit ]

Sevilla compete in the Seville bowler hat against their cross-city rivals veridical Betis. The two played each other for the first time on 8 October 1915 in a pit which was won 4–3 by Sevilla. The game is considered one of the most important derbies in spanish football. Sevilla besides has a significant competition with Atlético Madrid and Valencia CF. [ 87 ]

References [edit ]

France national football team

This article is about the men ‘s team. For the women ‘s team, see France women ‘s national football team National association football team

The France national football team ( french : Équipe de France de football ) represents France in men ‘s external football and is controlled by the french Football Federation ( Fédération française de football ), besides known as FFF. The team ‘s colours are blue, white, and loss, and the coq gaulois its symbol. France are colloquially known as Les Bleus ( The Blues ). They are the reigning world champions, having won the most recent World Cup final in 2018.

France plays their base matches at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, and their coach is Didier Deschamps. They have won two FIFA World Cups, two UEFA european Championships, two FIFA Confederations Cups, one Artemio Franchi Trophy and one UEFA Nations League style. France experienced much of its success in three different eras : in the 1980s, late 1990s/early 2000s and recently 2010s, respectively, which resulted in numerous major honours. France was one of the four european teams that participated in the inaugural World Cup in 1930. Twenty-eight years late, the team, led by Raymond Kopa and Just Fontaine, finished in third base place at the 1958 FIFA World Cup. In 1984, under the leadership of the three-time Ballon d’Or winner Michel Platini, France won UEFA Euro 1984 ( its first official entitle ), an Artemio Franchi Trophy ( 1985 ) and reached another two World Cup semi-finals ( 1982 and 1986 ). however, France only began to reach its prime from the 1990s ahead, with the establishment of INF Clairefontaine. During the captainship of Didier Deschamps, and with Zinedine Zidane on the pitch, Les Bleus won the FIFA World Cup in 1998 and triumphed at UEFA Euro 2000. They besides won the FIFA Confederations Cup in 2001 and 2003. Three years later, France made it all the way to the final of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, where they lost 5–3 on penalties to Italy. A ten late, the team reached the concluding of the UEFA European Championship, where they lost 1–0 to Portugal in supernumerary clock time. Two years late, France won the 2018 FIFA World Cup, its second deed in that competition, defeating Croatia 4–2 in the final match on 15 July 2018. finally, the french team became the first european national team to have won all potential senior FIFA and alliance competitions after winning the UEFA Nations League in October 2021. [ 3 ] [ 4 ]

history [edit ]

The France national football team was created in 1904 around the time of FIFA ‘s foundation on 21 May 1904 and contested its beginning official international peer on 1 May 1904 against Belgium in Brussels, which ended in a 3–3 draw. [ 5 ] The postdate class, on 12 February 1905, France contested their first-ever home pit against Switzerland. The match was played at the Parc des Princes in front of 500 supporters. France won the match 1–0 with the only finish coming from Gaston Cyprès. Due to disagreements between FIFA and the Union des Sociétés Françaises de Sports Athlétiques ( USFSA ), the country ‘s sports union, France struggled to establish an identity. On 9 May 1908, the french Interfederal Committee ( CFI ), a rival organization to the USFSA, ruled that FIFA would immediately be creditworthy for the cabaret ‘s appearances in forthcoming Olympic Games and not the USFSA. In 1919, the CFI transformed themselves into the french Football Federation ( FFF ). In 1921, the USFSA ultimately merged with the FFF. In July 1930, France appeared in the inaugural FIFA World Cup, held in Uruguay. In their first-ever World Cup match, France defeated Mexico 4–1 at the Estadio Pocitos in Montevideo. Lucien Laurent became noteworthy in the match as he scored not only France ‘s beginning World Cup goal, but the first gear goal in World Cup history. conversely, France besides became the first team to not score in a match after losing 1–0 to fellow group stage opponents Argentina. Another loss to Chile resulted in the team bowing out in the group stage. The surveil class saw the first survival of a black player to the national team. Raoul Diagne, who was of senegalese lineage, earned his beginning detonator on 15 February in a 2–1 frustration to Czechoslovakia. Diagne later played with the team at the 1938 World Cup, aboard Larbi Benbarek, who was one of the beginning players of north african lineage to play for the national team. At the 1934 World Cup, France suffered elimination in the opening round of golf, losing 3–2 to Austria. On the team ‘s refund to Paris, they were greeted as heroes by a herd of over 4,000 supporters. France hosted the 1938 World Cup and reached the quarterfinals, losing 3–1 to defending champions Italy. The 1950s saw France handed its first Golden Generation composed of players such as Just Fontaine, Raymond Kopa, Jean Vincent, Robert Jonquet, Maryan Wisnieski, Thadée Cisowski, and Armand Penverne. At the 1958 World Cup, France reached the semi-finals losing to Brazil. In the third-place match, France defeated West Germany 6–3 with Fontaine recording four goals, which brought his finish score in the contest to 13, a World Cup record. The record calm stands today. France hosted the inauguration UEFA European Football Championship in 1960 and, for the second square international tournament, reached the semi-finals. In the round, France faced Yugoslavia and were shocked 5–4 despite being up 4–2 heading into the 75th minute. In the third-place match, France was defeated 2–0 by the Czechoslovakians. The 1960s and 70s saw France decline significantly playing under respective managers and failing to qualify for numerous external tournaments. On 25 April 1964, Henri Guérin was formally installed as the team ‘s first coach. Under Guérin, France failed to qualify for the 1962 World Cup and the 1964 european Nations ‘ Cup. The team did return to major international act following qualification for the 1966 World Cup. The team lost in the group stage dowry of the tournament. Guérin was fired following the World Cup. He was replaced by José Arribas and Jean Snella, who worked as caretaker managers in double roles. The two only lasted four matches and were replaced by former external Just Fontaine, who only lasted two. Louis Dugauguez succeeded Fontaine and following his early struggles in reservation for the 1970 World Cup, was fired and replaced by Georges Boulogne, who could not get the team to the competition. Boulogne was belated fired following his failure to qualify for the 1974 World Cup and was replaced by the romanian Ștefan Kovács, who became the merely international coach to ever manage the national team. Kovács besides turned out to be a disappointment failing to qualify for the 1974 World Cup and UEFA Euro 1976. After two years in charge, he was sacked and replaced with Michel Hidalgo .
Under Hidalgo, France flourished, chiefly due to the accolades of great players like defenders Marius Trésor and Maxime Bossis, striker Dominique Rocheteau and midfielder Michel Platini, who, aboard Jean Tigana, Alain Giresse and Luis Fernández formed the “carré magique” ( “ Magic Square ” ), which would haunt opposing defenses beginning at the 1982 World Cup, where France reached the semi-finals losing on penalties to rivals West Germany. The semi-final match-up is considered one of the greatest matches in World Cup history and was marred with controversy. [ 6 ] France earned their beginning major international honor two years late, winning Euro 1984, which they hosted. Under the leadership of Platini, who scored a tournament-high nine goals, France defeated Spain 2–0 in the final. Platini and Bruno Bellone scored the goals. Following the Euro gloat, Hidalgo departed the team and was replaced by former international Henri Michel. France later completed the hat-trick when they won gold at the 1984 Summer Olympics football tournament and, a year subsequently, defeated Uruguay 2–0 to win the Artemio Franchi Trophy, an early harbinger to the FIFA Confederations Cup. Dominique Rocheteau and José Touré scored the goals. In a span of a year, France were holders of three of the four major international trophies. At the 1986 World Cup, France were favorites to win the competition, and, for the second straight World Cup, reached the semi-finals where they faced West Germany. Again, however, they lost. A 4–2 victory over Belgium gave France third place. In 1988, the FFF opened the Clairefontaine National Football Institute. Its opening ceremony was attended by then- President of France, François Mitterrand. Five months after Clairefontaine ‘s unfold, director Henri Michel was fired and was replaced by Michel Platini, who failed to get the team to the 1990 World Cup. Platini did lead the team to Euro 1992 and, despite going on a 19-match unbeaten streak prior to the rival, suffered elimination in the group stage. A week after the completion of the tournament, Platini stepped down ampere director and was replaced by his assistant Gérard Houllier. Under Houllier, France and its supporters experienced a heartbreaking meltdown after having qualification to the 1994 World Cup all but secured with two matches to go, which were against last place Israel and Bulgaria. In the peer against Israel, France was overturned 3–2 and, in the Bulgaria match, suffered an astronomic 2–1 frustration. The subsequent incrimination and public outshout to the open fire of Houllier and passing of several players from the national team fold. His assistant Aimé Jacquet was given his stake .
Under Jacquet, the home team experienced its triumphant years. The team composed of veterans that failed to reach the 1994 FIFA World Cup were joined by influential youngsters, such as Zinedine Zidane. The team started off well reaching the semi-finals of Euro 1996, where they lost 6–5 on penalties to the Czech Republic. In the team ‘s adjacent major tournament at the 1998 World Cup at home, Jacquet led France to glory defeating Brazil 3–0 in the final examination at the Stade de France in Paris. Jacquet stepped down after the country ‘s World Cup exuberate and was succeeded by adjunct Roger Lemerre who guided them through Euro 2000. Led by FIFA World Player of the Year Zidane, France defeated Italy 2–1 in the concluding. David Trezeguet scored the golden goal in extra clock time. The victory gave the team the distinction of being the foremost home team to hold both the World Cup and Euro titles since West Germany did so in 1974, and it was besides the first gear fourth dimension that a regnant World Cup winner went on to capture the Euro. Following the result, the France national team was inserted to the numeral one blot in the FIFA World Rankings .
France failed to maintain that yard in subsequent tournaments. Although, the team won the 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup, France suffered a first-round elimination at the 2002 World Cup. One of the greatest shocks in World Cup history saw France condemned to a 1–0 defeat to debutantes Senegal in the open game of the tournament. France became the second gear state to be eliminated in the first-round while holding the World Cup crown, the first base one being Brazil in 1966. After the 2010, 2014, and 2018 World Cups, Italy, Spain, and Germany were besides added to this tilt. [ 7 ] After France finished bottom of the group, Lemerre was dismissed and was replaced by Jacques Santini. A neat team started out powerfully at Euro 2004, but they were upset in the quarter-finals by the eventual winners Greece. Santini resigned as coach and Raymond Domenech was picked as his surrogate. France struggled in the early qualifiers for the 2006 World Cup. This prompted Domenech to persuade respective past members out of international retirement to help the national team modify, which they accomplished following a convincing 4–0 acquire over Cyprus on the concluding day of qualifying. In the 2006 World Cup concluding stages, France finished undefeated in the group stage dowry and advanced all the way to the final kill the likes of Spain, Brazil, and Portugal en route. France played Italy in the final and, in part down to controversial disruptions in supernumerary time that lead to captain Zinedine Zidane being sent off, failed to find a winning goal, Italy winning 5–3 on penalties to be crowned World Cup champions .
The french team in front of fans in 2006. France started its qualify beat for Euro 2008 strong and qualified for the tournament, despite two defeats to Scotland. France bowed out during the group stage part of the tournament after having been placed in the group of death ( which included Netherlands and Italy ). [ 8 ] [ 9 ] Just like the team ‘s previous World Cup qualifying campaign, the 2010 crusade got off to a disappointing depart with France suffering black losses and earning uninspired victories. France finally finished irregular in the group and earned a spotlight in the UEFA play-offs against the Republic of Ireland for a place in South Africa. In the first leg, France defeated the irish 1–0 and in the second leg procured a 1–1 string, via controversial circumstances, to qualify for the World Cup. [ 10 ] In the 2010 World Cup final stages, the team continued to perform under expectations and were eliminated in the group stage, while the veto publicity the national team received during the rival led to further repercussions back in France. Midway through the competition, striker Nicolas Anelka was dismissed from the national team after reportedly having a dispute, in which obscenities were passed, with team director Raymond Domenech during half-time of the team ‘s loss to Mexico. [ 11 ] [ 12 ] The result disagreement over Anelka ‘s ejection between the players, the coach staff and FFF officials resulted in the players boycotting aim before their third base game. [ 13 ] [ 14 ] [ 15 ] In reply to the train boycott, Sports Minister Roselyne Bachelot lectured the players and “ reduced France ‘s discredit World Cup stars to tears with an emotional speech on the eve of their final examination group A match ”. [ 16 ] France then lost their final game 2–1 to the hosts South Africa and failed to advance to the knockout stage. The day after the team ‘s elimination, it was reported by numerous media outlets that then President of France Nicolas Sarkozy would meet with team master Thierry Henry to discuss the issues associated with the team ‘s meltdown at the World Cup, at Henry ‘s request. [ 17 ] Following the completion of the World Cup tournament, Federation President Jean-Pierre Escalettes resigned from his military position. Domenech, whose contract had expired, was succeeded as head coach by erstwhile international Laurent Blanc. On 23 July 2010, at the request of Blanc, the FFF suspended all 23 players in the World Cup police squad for the team ‘s friendly match against Norway after the World Cup. [ 18 ] On 6 August, five players who were deemed to have played a major character in the trail boycott were disciplined for their roles. [ 19 ] [ 20 ]
After captaining France intermittently since 2010, goalkeeper Hugo Lloris has been the french captain permanently since February 2012. At Euro 2012 in Poland and Ukraine, France reached the quarter-finals, where they were beaten by eventual champions Spain. [ 21 ] [ 22 ] Following the tournament, coach Laurent Blanc resigned and was succeeded by Didier Deschamps, who captained France to glory in the 1998 World Cup and Euro 2000. [ 23 ] [ 24 ] His team qualified for the 2014 World Cup by beating Ukraine in the playoffs, and Deschamps then extended his contract until Euro 2016. [ 25 ] Missing asterisk midfielder Franck Ribéry through injury, [ 26 ] France lost to eventual champions Germany in the quarter-finals courtesy of an early goal by Mats Hummels. [ 27 ] Paul Pogba was awarded the Best Young Player award during the tournament. [ 28 ] France mechanically qualified as hosts for Euro 2016. [ 29 ] Karim Benzema and Hatem Ben Arfa were not in the squad. [ 30 ] [ 31 ] France were drawn in Group A of the tournament aboard Romania, Switzerland and Albania. [ 32 ] France won their group with wins over Romania and Albania and a scoreless draw against Switzerland and were poised to play the Republic of Ireland in the round of sixteen. [ 33 ] Ireland took the lead after just two minutes through a controversially awarded penalty, which was converted by Robbie Brady. A brace from Antoine Griezmann, however, helped France to win the match 2–1 and qualify for the quarter-finals, where they beat a bouncy Iceland 5–2 to set up a semi-final clash against world champions and tournament co-favourites Germany. [ 34 ] [ 35 ] [ 36 ] France won the match 2–0, marking their first gain over Germany at a major tournament since 1958. [ 37 ] [ 38 ] France, however, were beaten by Portugal 1–0 in the final examination courtesy of an extra-time goal by Eder. Griezmann was named the Player of the Tournament and was besides awarded the Golden Boot in summation to being named in the team of the Tournament, aboard Dimitri Payet. The frustration meant that France became the second nation to have lost the final on home dirty, after Portugal lost the final to Greece in 2004. [ 39 ] [ 40 ] [ 41 ] [ 42 ] [ 43 ]
In 2018 FIFA World Cup qualifying, France topped their group with 23 points ; winning 7 wins, drawing 2 and losing once, [ 44 ] although their two draws were against well weaker nations, drawing 0–0 with Belarus in their open match [ 45 ] and against Luxembourg, failing to secure a acquire against the latter since 1914, closely 103 years. [ 46 ] Their only frustration of the qualifying phase was against Sweden ; losing 2–1 in the last few minutes following an error from goalkeeper Hugo Lloris. [ 47 ] France secured reservation to the World Cup finals with a 2–1 win over Belarus after atomizing the Netherlands 4 to 0 at home a few weeks sooner. [ 48 ] They were drawn to play Australia, Peru and Denmark in a group in which they were considered heavy favourites. [ 49 ] [ 50 ] Overall, due to the intensity and rate of their team, France were tipped by many as one of the favourites for the title. [ 51 ] [ 52 ] [ 53 ] France, however, had a slightly disappointing performance in the group stage, only managing a 2–1 gain over Australia and a 1–0 winnings over Peru, followed by a match against Denmark which finished in a 0–0 draw. [ 54 ] [ 55 ] [ 56 ] [ 57 ] France beat Argentina 4–3 in the orotund of sixteen and then Uruguay 2–0 to qualify for the semi-final stage, where they beat belgium 1–0 courtesy of a goal from defender Samuel Umtiti. [ 58 ] [ 59 ] On 15 July, France beat Croatia in the final examination with result 4–2 to win the World Cup for the second clock. [ 60 ] Didier Deschamps became the one-third world to win the World Cup as a musician and a coach and besides became the second base serviceman to win the style as a captain and a coach. [ 61 ] Kylian Mbappé was awarded the Best Young Player award and Antoine Griezmann was awarded the Bronze Ball and the Silver Boot for their operation during the tournament. [ 62 ] Upon scoring in the final, Mbappé became merely the second base adolescent to score in a World Cup Final, the stopping point being Pelé in 1958 .

home stadium [edit ]

During France ‘s early on years, the team ‘s national stadium alternated between the Parc des Princes in Paris and the Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir in Colombes. France besides hosted matches at the Stade Pershing, Stade de Paris, and the Stade Buffalo, but to a minimal degree. As the years moved ahead, France began hosting matches outside the city of Paris at such venues as the Stade Marcel Saupin in Nantes, the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille, the Stade de Gerland in Lyon, and the Stade de la Meinau in Strasbourg .
Following the renovation of the Parc des Princes in 1972, which gave the stadium the largest capacity in Paris, France moved into the venue permanently. The team still hosted friendly matches and minor FIFA World Cup and UEFA European Football Championship reservation matches at other venues. Twice France have played home matches in a french abroad department – in 2005 against Costa Rica in Fort-de-France ( Martinique ) and in 2010 against China in Saint Pierre ( Réunion ). Both matches were friendlies. In 1998, the Stade de France was inaugurated as France ‘s national stadium ahead of the 1998 World Cup. Located in Saint-Denis, a parisian suburb, the stadium has an all-seater capacity of 81,338. France ‘s first gear match at the stadium was played on 28 January 1998 against Spain. France won the match 1–0, with Zinedine Zidane scoring the alone goal. Since that match, France has used the stadium for about every major home game, including the 1998 World Cup final. prior to matches, home or off, the national team trains at the INF Clairefontaine academy in Clairefontaine-en-Yvelines. Clairefontaine is the home association football centre and is among 12 élite academies throughout the area. The center was inaugurated in 1976 by former FFF president Fernand Sastre and opened in 1988. The concentrate drew media spotlight following its use as a infrastructure camp by the team that won the 1998 World Cup. In the twentieth and 23rd infinitesimal of an external friendly on 13 November 2015, against Germany, three groups of terrorists attempted to detonate turkey vests, at three entrances of Stade de France, and two explosions occurred. Play would continue, until the 94th minute, in order to keep the crowd from panicking. consequently, the stadium was evacuated through the insensible gates of the stadium away from the players benches. Due to the blocked exits, spectators who could not leave the stadium had to go down to the pitch and expect until it was safe .

team persona [edit ]

Media coverage [edit ]

The national team has a broadcast medium agreement with TF1 Group, who the Federal Council of the FFF agreed to extend its exclusive broadcast agreement with the channel. The new softwood grants the channel exclusive air rights for the matches of national team, which include friendlies and international games for the future four seasons beginning in August 2010 and ending in June 2014. will besides have extended rights, notably on the Internet, and may besides broadcast images of the national team in its hebdomadally course of study, Téléfoot. [ 63 ] The FFF will receive €45 million a season, a €10 million decrease from the €55 million they received from the previous agreement reached in 2006. [ 64 ] After France won their second World Cup in 2018, M6 in concert with TF1 broadcast all international fixtures featuring France respectively until 2022. [ 65 ]

Kits and crest [edit ]

France team that played its first international five Belgium in 1904, wearing the white shirt with the rings emblem The France national team utilizes a three semblance system composed of aristocratic, white, and crimson. The team ‘s three colours originate from the national flag of France, known as the tricolore. Nevertheless, the beginning France shirt ( as seen in their first official international catch against Belgium in 1904 ) was white, with the two complect rings emblem of USFSA –the body that controlled sport in France by then– [ 66 ] on the leftover. [ 67 ] France normally wear blue shirts, white shorts, and crimson socks at home plate ( alike frame-up to Japan ), while, when on the road, the team utilizes an all-white combination or wear crimson shirts, bluing shorts, and amobarbital sodium socks with the early being the most stream. between 1909 and 1914, France wore a white shirt with gloomy stripes, white shorts, and red socks. In a 1978 World Cup match against Hungary in Mar del Plata, both teams arrived at Estadio José María Minella with whiten kits, indeed France played in green-and-white clean shirts borrowed from Club Atlético Kimberley. [ 68 ]
Beginning in 1966, France had its shirts made by Le Coq Sportif until 1971. In 1972, France reached an agreement with german sports apparel manufacturer Adidas to be the team ‘s kit provider. Over the adjacent 38 years, the two would maintain a healthy relationship with France winning Euro 1984, the 1998 World Cup and Euro 2000 while wearing Adidas ‘ celebrated tricolour three stripes. During the 2006 World Cup, France wore an all-white switch undress in all four of its smasher matches, including the final. [ 69 ] On 22 February 2008, the FFF announced that they were ending their partnership with Adidas and signing with Nike, effective 1 January 2011. The unprecedented deal was valued at €320 million over seven years ( 1 January 2011 – 9 July 2018 ), making France ‘s bluing shirt the most expensive ever in the history of football. [ 70 ] [ 71 ]
The first France kit break in a major tournament produced by Nike was the Euro 2012 strip, which was all black bluing and use amber as an accent color. [ 72 ] In February 2013, Nike revealed an all pamper blue change plunder. In advance of France ‘s host of Euro 2016, Nike unveiled a new, unconventional kit set : amobarbital sodium shirts and shorts with red socks at home, egg white shirts and shorts and with blue socks away. The away shirt as break in pre-Euro friendlies and released to the public besides featured one blue sleeve and one red sleeve in reference to the “ tricolore ”. however, due to UEFA regulations, France was forced to wear a limited version with the sleeve colours about desaturated in their euro 2016 group stagecoach game against Switzerland, which continued to be worn during 2018 World Cup qualifying. [ 73 ]

Kit deals [edit ]

Kit supplier

Period

Contract
announcement

Contract
duration

Value

Notes

United StatesNike

2011–present

2008-02-22

2011–2018 (7 years)

Total €340.8 million
(€42.6 million per year)[76]

2016-12-08

2018–2026 (8 years)

Total €450 million
(€50 million per year)[77]

dub [edit ]

France is often referred to by the media and supporters as Les Bleus ( The Blues ), which is the nickname associated with all of France ‘s international sport teams ascribable to the amobarbital sodium shirts each team incorporates. The team is besides referred to as Les Tricolores or L’Equipe Tricolore ( The Tri-color Team ) due to the team ‘s use of the state ‘s national colors : blue, white, and crimson. During the 1980s, France earned the nickname the “Brazilians of Europe” chiefly due to the accolades of the “carré magique” ( “ Magic Square ” ), who were anchored by Michel Platini. Led by coach Michel Hidalgo, France exhibited an inspire, elegant, nice and technically advance offensive style of football, which was strikingly similar to their south american counterparts. [ 78 ]

Results and fixtures [edit ]

The follow matches have been played within the past 12 months .

2021 [edit ]

2022 [edit ]

France volt TBD 21–24 November 2022 2022 FIFA World Cup vQatar

Stadium: TBDFrance volt TBD 25–28 November 2022 2022 FIFA World Cup vQatar

Stadium: TBD France TBD five 29 November – 2 December 2022 2022 FIFA World Cup vQatar

Stadium: TBD

Coaching staff [edit ]

As of August 2019.[79]

Coaching history [edit ]

As of 16 November 2021
Managers in italics were hired as caretakers

Manager

France career

Pld

W

D

L

Win %

France

1964–1966

15
5
4
6
0 33.3
Spain
France

1966

4
2
0
2
0 50.0
France

1967

2
0
0
2
00 0.0
France

1967–1968

9
2
3
4
0 22.2
France

1969–1973

31
15
5
11
0 48.4
Romania

1973–1975

15
6
4
5
0 40.0
France

1976–1984

75
41

Read more: Lille OSC

16
18
0 54.7
France

1984–1988

36
16
12
8
0 44.4
France

1988–1992

29
16
8
5
0 55.2
France

1992–1993

12
7
1
4
0 58.3
France

1993–1998

53
34
16
3
0 64.2
France

1998–2002

53
34
11
8
0 64.2
France

2002–2004

28
22
4
2
0 78.6
France

2004–2010

79
41
24
14
0 51.9
France

2010–2012

27
16
7
4
0 59.3
France
2012– present
124
81
25
18
0 65.3

Players [edit ]

For all past and present players who have appeared for the national team, see List of France external footballers

stream team [edit ]

The succeed 23 players have been called up for the 2022 FIFA World Cup reservation matches against Kazakhstan on 13 November 2021 and against Finland on 16 November 2021. [ 80 ] Caps and goals as of 16 November 2021, after the team’s match against Finland.

late call-ups [edit ]

The following players have been called up within the past twelve months .

player of the year [edit ]

player records [edit ]

As of 16 November 2021[81]
Players in bold are still active with France.

Most capped players [edit ]

Lilian Thuram is the most cap actor in the history of France with 142 caps .

clear goalscorers [edit ]

Thierry Henry is the top scorer in the history of France with 51 goals.

competitive record [edit ]

For single-match results of the national team, see french football single-season articles and the team ‘s results page

FIFA World Cup [edit ]

France was one of the four european teams that participated at the inauguration World Cup in 1930 and have appeared in 15 FIFA World Cups, tied for sixth-best. The national team is one of eight national teams to have won at least one FIFA World Cup title. The France team won their first World Cup entitle in 1998. The tournament was played on home land and France defeated Brazil 3–0 in the final examination match. In 2006, France finished as runner-up losing 5–3 on penalties to Italy. The team has besides finished in third station on two occasions in 1958 and 1986 and in fourthly put once in 1982. The team ‘s worst results in the contest were first-round eliminations in 2002 and 2010. In 2002, the team suffered an unexpected loss to Senegal and departed the tournament without scoring a goal, while in 2010, a french team torn apart by conflict between the players and staff lost two of three matches and drew the other. [ 82 ] [ 83 ] In 2014, France advanced to the quarterfinal before losing to the eventual supporter, Germany, 1–0. In 2018, France defeated Croatia 4–2 in the final catch and won the World Cup for the second base time. [ 84 ]
FIFA World Cup record

Qualification record

Year

Round

Position

*

Squad

Uruguay1930

Group stage

7th

3

1

0

2

4

3

Squad
Qualified as invitees
Italy1934

Round of 16

9th

1

0

0

1

2

3

Squad

1

1

0

0

6

1

1934
France1938

Quarter-finals

6th

2

1

0

1

4

4

Squad
Qualified as hosts
1938
Brazil1950
Originally did not qualify, then invited, later withdrew

3

0

2

1

4

5

1950
Switzerland1954

Group stage

11th

2

1

0

1

3

3

Squad

4

4

0

0

20

4

1954
Sweden1958
Third place
3rd
6
4
0
2
23
15
Squad

4

3

1

0

19

4

1958
Chile1962
Did not qualify

5

3

0

2

10

4

1962
England1966

Group stage

13th

3

0

1

2

2

5

Squad

6

5

0

1

9

2

1966
Mexico1970
Did not qualify

4

2

0

2

6

4

1970
West Germany1974

4

1

1

2

3

5

1974
Argentina1978

Group stage

12th

3

1

0

2

5

5

Squad

4

2

1

1

7

4

1978
Spain1982
Fourth place
4th
7
3
2
2
16
12
Squad

8

5

0

3

20

8

1982
Mexico1986
Third place
3rd
7
4
2
1
12
6
Squad

8

5

1

2

15

4

1986
Italy1990
Did not qualify

8

3

3

2

10

7

1990
United States1994

10

6

1

3

17

10

1994
France1998
Champions
1st
7
6
1
0
15
2
Squad
Qualified as hosts
1998
South KoreaJapan2002

Group stage

28th

3

0

1

2

0

3

Squad
Qualified as defending champions
2002
Germany2006
Runners-up
2nd
7
4
3
0
9
3
Squad

10

5

5

0

14

2

2006
South Africa2010

Group stage

29th

3

0

1

2

1

4

Squad

12

7

4

1

20

10

2010
Brazil2014

Quarter-finals

7th

5

3

1

1

10

3

Squad

10

6

2

2

18

8

2014
Russia2018
Champions
1st
7
6
1
0
14
6
Squad

10

7

2

1

18

6

2018
Qatar2022
Qualified

8

5

3

0

18

3

2022
CanadaMexicoUnited States2026
To be determined
To be determined
2026

Total

2 titles

16/21

66

34

13

19

120

77

119

70

26

23

234

91

*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
**Red border indicates tournament was held on home soil.

UEFA european championship [edit ]

France is one of the most successful nations at the UEFA European Championship having won two titles in 1984 and 2000. The team is fair below Spain and Germany who have won three titles each. France hosted the inaugural competition in 1960 and have appeared in nine UEFA european backing tournaments, tied for fourth-best. The team won their first style on base territory in 1984 and were led by Ballon d’Or winner Michel Platini. In 2000, the team, led by FIFA World Player of the Year Zinedine Zidane, won its second championship in Belgium and the Netherlands. The team ‘s worst leave in the competition was a first-round elimination in 1992 and 2008 .
UEFA European Championship record

Qualifying record

Year

Round

Position

*

Squad

France1960
Fourth place
4th
2
0
0
2
4
7
Squad

4

3

1

0

17

6

1960
Spain1964
Did not qualify

6

2

1

3

11

10

1964
Italy1968

8

4

2

2

16

12

1968
Belgium1972

6

3

1

2

10

8

1972
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia1976

6

1

3

2

7

6

1976
Italy1980

6

4

1

1

13

7

1980
France1984
Champions
1st
5
5
0
0
14
4
Squad
Qualified as hosts
1984
West Germany1988
Did not qualify

8

1

4

3

4

7

1988
Sweden1992

Group stage

6th

3

0

2

1

2

3

Squad

8

8

0

0

20

6

1992
England1996
Semi-finals
4th
5
2
3
0
5
2
Squad

10

5

5

0

22

2

1996
BelgiumNetherlands2000
Champions
1st
6
5
0
1
13
7
Squad

10

6

3

1

17

10

2000
Portugal2004

Quarter-finals

6th

4

2

1

1

7

5

Squad

8

8

0

0

29

2

2004
AustriaSwitzerland2008

Group stage

15th

3

0

1

2

1

6

Squad

12

8

2

2

25

5

2008
PolandUkraine2012

Quarter-finals

8th

4

1

1

2

3

5

Squad

10

6

3

1

15

4

2012
France2016
Runners-up
2nd
7
5
1
1
13
5
Squad
Qualified as hosts
2016
Europe2020

Round of 16

11th

4

1

3

0

7

6

Squad

10

8

1

1

25

6

2020
Germany2024
To be determined
To be determined
2024

Total

2 titles

10/16

43

21

12

10

69

50

112

67

27

18

231

91

*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
**Red border indicates tournament was held on home soil.

UEFA Nations League [edit ]

*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
**Group stage played home and away. Flag shown represents host nation for the finals stage.
**Red border indicates the finals stage will be held on home soil

FIFA Confederations Cup [edit ]

France have appeared in two of the eight FIFA Confederations Cups contested and won the competition on both appearances. The team ‘s two titles place in second place only trailing Brazil who have won four. France won their first Confederations Cup in 2001 having appeared in the rival as a consequence of winning the FIFA World Cup in 1998. The team defeated Japan 1–0 in the final match. In the follow Confederations Cup in 2003, France, appearing in the rival as the host country, won the competition beating Cameroon 1–0 after extra time .

minor tournaments [edit ]

Honours [edit ]

This is a list of honours for the senior France national team

FIFA World Cup

  • Champions (2): 1998, 2018
  • Runners-up: 2006
  • Third place: 1958, 1986
  • Fourth place: 1982

UEFA European Championship

  • Champions (2): 1984, 2000
  • Runners-up: 2016
  • Semi-finals: 1960, 1996

FIFA Confederations Cup

  • Champions (2): 2001, 2003

Artemio Franchi Trophy ( or Intercontinental Cup of Nations )

  • Winners: 1985

UEFA Nations League

minor titles [edit ]

Évence Coppée Trophy

  • Winners: 1904 (shared with Belgium)

Tournoi de France
Kuwait Tournament

  • Winners: 1990

Kirin Cup

  • Winners: 1994

Hassan II Trophy

  • Winners: 1998, 2000

Nelson Mandela Challenge

  • Winners: 2000 (shared with South Africa)

See besides [edit ]

Notes [edit ]

References [edit ]

Read more: Real Sociedad

S.S. Lazio

professional italian sports clubhouse based in Rome

football club
The operation of Lazio in the italian football league structure since the beginning temper of a unify Serie A ( 1929–30 ).

Reading: S.S. Lazio

Società Sportiva Lazio ( italian pronunciation : [ sot͡ʃeˈta sporˈtiva ˈlattsjo ] ; BIT : SSL ; Lazio Sport Club ), normally referred to as Lazio, is an italian professional sports club based in Rome, most known for its football action. [ 3 ] The club, founded in 1900, plays in the Serie A and have spent most of their history in the crown tier of italian football. Lazio have been italian champions twice ( 1974, 2000 ), and have won the Coppa Italia seven times, the Supercoppa Italiana three times, and both the UEFA Cup Winners ‘ Cup and UEFA Super Cup on one occasion. [ 4 ] The club had their first major success in 1958, winning the domestic cup. In 1974, they won their first Serie A style. The 1990s were the most successful time period in Lazio ‘s history, with the team reaching the UEFA Cup final in 1998, winning the UEFA Cup Winners ‘ Cup and UEFA Super Cup in 1999, and clinching the Serie A title in 2000. Due to a severe economic crisis in 2002 that forced president of the united states Sergio Cragnotti out of the golf club along with several star players being sold, Lazio ‘s success in the league declined. In malice of the lower funds, the club has won four Coppa Italia titles since then ; in 2004, 2009, 2013 and 2019. Current president Claudio Lotito took charge of the club in 2004, filling the vacuum that had existed following Cragnotti ‘s departure. Lazio ‘s traditional kit colours are flip blue shirts and white shorts with white socks ; the colours are evocative of Rome ‘s ancient Hellenic bequest. Sky blue socks have besides been interchangeably used as home colours. Their home is the 70,634 [ 1 ] capacity Stadio Olimpico in Rome, which they share with A.S. Roma. Lazio have a long-standing competition with Roma, with whom they have contested the Derby della Capitale ( in English “ Derby of the capital city ” or Rome bowler hat ) since 1929. [ 5 ] Despite initially not having any parent–subsidiary relation with the male and female master team ( that was incorporated as S.S. Lazio S.p.A. ), the establish of Società Sportiva Lazio allowed for the club that participates in over 40 sports disciplines in sum, more than any other sports association in the world. [ 6 ] [ 7 ]

history

Plaque commemorating the initiation of Lazio at Piazza della Libertà ( Roma, Prati ) Società Podistica Lazio was founded on 9 January 1900 in the Prati district of Rome. [ 8 ] Until 1910, the club played at an amateurish level until it formally joined the league contest in 1912 equally soon as the italian Football Federation began organising championships in the center field and south of Italy, and reached the concluding of the national backing playoff three times, but never won, losing in 1913 to Pro Vercelli, in 1914 to Casale and in 1923 to Genoa 1893. In 1927, Lazio was the entirely major Roman club which resisted the Fascist regimen ‘s attempts to merge all the city ‘s teams into what would become A.S. Roma the same year. The club played in the beginning organised Serie A in 1929 and, led by legendary italian striker Silvio Piola, [ 9 ] achieved a second-place ending in 1937 – its highest pre-war result. The 1950s produced a mix of mid and upper table results with a Coppa Italia win in 1958. Lazio was relegated for the first time in 1961 to the Serie B, but returned in the top trajectory two years late. After a number of mid-table placements, another relegation followed in 1970–71. [ 10 ] Back to Serie A in 1972–73, Lazio immediately emerged as surprise challengers for the Scudetto to Milan and Juventus in 1972–73, entirely losing out on the concluding day of the season, with a team comprising captain Giuseppe Wilson, deoxyadenosine monophosphate well as midfielders Luciano Re Cecconi and Mario Frustalupi, striker Giorgio Chinaglia, and head coach Tommaso Maestrelli. [ 11 ] Lazio improved such successes the following season, ensuring its first entitle in 1973–74. [ 12 ] [ 13 ] however, tragic deaths of Re Cecconi [ 14 ] and Scudetto trainer Maestrelli, ampere well as the deviation of Chinaglia, would be a ternary blow for Lazio. The emergence of Bruno Giordano during this time period provided some easing as he finished League top scorekeeper in 1979, when Lazio finished one-eighth. [ 15 ]
scudetto in 1974 S.S. Lazio team which won the club ‘s firstin 1974 Lazio were forcibly relegated to Serie B in 1980 due to a remarkable scandal concerning illegal bets on their own matches, along with Milan. They remained in Italy ‘s moment division for three seasons in what would mark the darkest menstruation in Lazio ‘s history. They would return in 1983 and manage a last-day evasion from relegation the follow temper. The 1984–85 season would prove harrow, with a hapless 15 points and bottom place finish. In 1986, Lazio was hit with a nine-point deduction ( a true deathblow binding in the day of the two-point winnings ) for a dissipated scandal involving player Claudio Vinazzani. An epic struggle against delegating followed the lapp season in Serie B, with the club led by flight simulator Eugenio Fascetti only avoiding relegation to the Serie C after play-off wins over Taranto and Campobasso. This would prove a turning point in the cabaret ‘s history, with Lazio returning to Serie A in 1988 and, under the careful fiscal management of Gianmarco Calleri, the consolidation of the golf club ‘s position as a solid top-flight club. [ 16 ] [ 17 ]
The arrival of Sergio Cragnotti in 1992 changed the cabaret ‘s history due to his long-run investments in new players to make the team a Scudetto rival. A celebrated early on transportation during his tenure was the capture of English midfielder Paul Gascoigne from Tottenham Hotspur for £5.5 million. Gascoigne ‘s transfer to Lazio is credited with the increase of concern in Serie A in the United Kingdom during the 1990s. Cragnotti repeatedly broke transfer records in pursuit of players who were considered major stars – Juan Sebastián Verón for £18 million, Christian Vieri for £19 million and breaking the universe transfer record, albeit only for a matter of weeks, to sign Hernán Crespo from Parma for £35 million. [ 18 ] Lazio were Serie A runner-up in 1995, third in 1996 and fourth in 1997, then losing the championship just by one point to Milan on the stopping point backing ‘s couple in 1999 before, with the likes of Siniša Mihajlović, Alessandro Nesta, Marcelo Salas and Pavel Nedvěd in the side, winning its second Scudetto in 2000, equally well as the Coppa Italia double with Sven-Göran Eriksson ( 1997–2001 ) as director .
Lazio had two more Coppa Italia triumph in 1998 and 2004, a well as the concluding UEFA Cup Winners ‘ Cup in 1999. [ 19 ] They besides reached the UEFA Cup, but lost 0–3 against Internazionale. [ 20 ] In addition, Lazio won the Supercoppa Italiana doubly and get the better of Manchester United in 1999 to win the UEFA Super Cup. [ 21 ] In 2000, Lazio became besides the foremost italian football cabaret to be quoted on the italian Piazza Affari stock market. [ 22 ] With money running out, however, Lazio ‘s results lento worsened in the years. In 2002, a fiscal scandal involving Cragnotti and his food products multinational Cirio forced him to leave the club, and Lazio was controlled until 2004 by caretaker fiscal managers and a bank pool. This forced the club to sell their star players and even fan favorite captain Alessandro Nesta. In 2004, entrepreneur Claudio Lotito acquired the majority of the golf club. [ 23 ] In 2006, the club qualified to the 2006–07 UEFA Cup under coach Delio Rossi. The club, however, was excluded from european competitions ascribable to their participation in a match-fixing scandal. [ 24 ] In the 2006–07 temper, despite a later-reduced points subtraction, Lazio achieved a third-place coating, frankincense gaining reservation to the UEFA Champions League third base qualifying circle, where they defeated Dinamo București to reach the group phase, and ended fourth space in the group composed of Real Madrid, Werder Bremen and Olympiacos. Things in the league did not go much better, with the team spend most of the temper in the bottom half of the table, sparking the protests of the fans, and finally ending the Serie A season in 12th station. In the 2008–09 season, Lazio won their fifth Coppa Italia, beating Sampdoria in the final examination. [ 25 ] Lazio started the 2009–10 season playing the Supercoppa Italiana against Inter in Beijing and winning the match 2–1, with goals from Matuzalém and Tommaso Rocchi. [ 26 ] Lazio won the 2012–13 Coppa Italia 1–0 over rivals Roma with the alone goal coming from Senad Lulić. [ 27 ] Lazio won the 2018–19 Coppa Italia 2–0 over Atalanta, winning their seventh entitle overall. [ 28 ] On 22 December 2019, Lazio won their fifth Supercoppa Italiana title, following a 3–1 victory over Juventus. [ 29 ] Lazio mounted an unexpected deed challenge during the 2019–20 Serie A season. A poor run of form following the restart of the Serie A campaign after the COVID-19 suspension saw Lazio fall out of the championship slipstream. On 24 July 2020, Lazio qualified for the Champions League for the first base time in 12 years after securing a top 4 eat up. [ 30 ]

Colours, badge and nicknames



first kit always worn by the club Lazio ‘s color of white and flip blue were inspired by the national emblem of Greece, due to the fact that Lazio is a shuffle sports club this was chosen in recognition of the fact that the Ancient Olympic Games and along with it the sporting custom in Europe is linked to Greece. [ 31 ] originally, Lazio wore a shirt which was divided into ashen and flip blue quarters, with black shorts and socks. [ 32 ] After a while of wearing a complain white shirt very early on, Lazio reverted to the colours which they wear today. [ 32 ] Some seasons Lazio have used a flip blue and white shirt with stripes, but normally it is flip blue with a white shave, with the white shorts and socks. [ 32 ] The clubhouse ‘s colours have led to their italian nickname of Biancocelesti. [ 33 ] Lazio ‘s traditional club badge and symbol is the eagle, which was chosen by founding penis Luigi Bigiarelli. [ 34 ] It is an citation to the emblem of Zeus ( the god of flip and thunder in Greek mythology ) normally referred to as Aquila ; Lazio ‘s use of the symbol has led to two of their nicknames ; le Aquile ( “ the Eagles ” ) and Aquilotti ( “ Eaglets ” ). The current club badge features a gold eagle above a white shield with a blue border ; inside the shield is the golf club ‘s diagnose and a smaller tripartite carapace with the colours of the club .

stadium

Stadio Olimpico, located on the Foro Italico, is the major stadium of Rome. It is the dwelling of the Italy national football team deoxyadenosine monophosphate well as of both local teams Lazio and Roma. It was opened in 1937 and after its latest renovation in 2008, [ 35 ] the stadium has a capacitance of 70,634 seats. [ 1 ] It was the site of the 1960 Summer Olympics, but has besides served as the localization of the 1987 World Athletics Championships, the 1980 european Championship final examination, the 1990 World Cup and the Champions League Final in 1996 and 2009. [ 1 ] besides on the Foro Italico lies the Stadio dei Marmi, or “ marble stadium ”, which was built in 1932 and designed by Enrico Del Debbio. It has tiers topped by 60 egg white marble statues that were gifts from italian cities in memorial of 60 athletes. During the 1989–90 season, Lazio and Roma played their games at the Stadio Flaminio of Rome, located in the zone Flaminio, because of the renovation works carried out at the Stadio Olimpico .

In June 2018, Lazio President Claudio Lotito stated that “ Lazio should be granted the same privilege and treatment as Roma – the ability to besides build a new stadium. He besides added that “ Lazio ‘s stadium will be built before Roma ‘s stadium. ” [ 36 ] In June 2019, Lazio President Claudio Lotito was set to present the designs of a potential future stadium for Lazio, named the Stadio delle Aquile. [ 37 ] however, this did not occur for reasons unknown .

Supporters and rivalries

Lazio is the sixth-most supported football club in Italy and the moment in Rome, with around 2 % of italian football fans supporting the club ( according to La Repubblica’s research of August 2008 ). [ 38 ] Historically, the largest section of Lazio supporters in the city of Rome has come from the far northern section, creating an arch -like human body across Rome with affluent areas such as Parioli, Prati, Flaminio, Cassia and Monte Mario. [ 39 ]

Read more: S.L. Benfica

Founded in 1987, Irriducibili Lazio were the golf club ‘s biggest ultras group for over 30 years. They typically create traditional italian extremist displays during the Derby della Capitale ( Rome Derby ), [ 40 ] the match between Lazio and their main rivals, Roma. It is amongst the most heated and emotional footballing rivalries in the global, [ 41 ] such as where Lazio fan Vincenzo Paparelli was killed at one of the bowler hat games during the 1979–80 season after being hit in the center by an hand brake rocket thrown by a Roma fan. [ 42 ] [ 43 ] A minority of Lazio ‘s ultras used to use swastika and fascist symbols on their banners, and they have displayed racist demeanor in several occasions during the derbies. Most notably, at a bowler hat of the season 1998–99, laziali unfurled a 50-metre banner around the Curva Nord that read, “ Auschwitz is your township, the ovens are your houses ”. Black players of Roma have often been receivers of racist and dysphemistic behavior. [ 44 ] After 33 years, the Irriducibili disbanded on 27 February 2020, citing “ excessively much rake, excessively many banning orders, excessively many arrests. ” [ 45 ] Lazio ‘s ultras now go by the name Ultras Lazio. [ 46 ] Lazio besides have a strong competition with Napoli and Livorno, adenine well as with Pescara and Atalanta. The baseball club besides maintains strong competitive rivalries with Fiorentina, Juventus, and Milan. conversely, the ultras have friendly relationships with Internazionale, Triestina, and Hellas Verona. Internationally, Lazio ‘s fans maintain a long-standing impregnable friendship with the supporters of the Bulgarian cabaret Levski Sofia and as such, Lazio were invited to participate in the centennial football match honouring the birthday of the bulgarian cabaret. [ 47 ] [ 48 ]

Players

For a tilt of all erstwhile and current S.S. Lazio players with a Wikipedia article, see class : S.S. Lazio players

stream team

As of 24 October 2021[49]

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

other players under narrow

As of 12 September 2021.

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

Out on lend

As of 31 August 2021.

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

young sector

retire numbers

12 – Since the 2003–04 temper, Curva Nord of Stadio Olimpico, as a sign of recognition towards the Curva Nord, is considered the 12th man in the playing field .

luminary managers

The following managers have all won at least one trophy when in charge of Lazio :

Honours

National

Winners (5): 1998, 2000, 2009, 2017, 2019

european

Winners (1): 1999

Statistics and records

Giuseppe Favalli holds Lazio ‘s official appearance record, having made 401 over the course of 16 years from 1992 until 2004. [ 54 ] The commemorate for total appearances by a goalkeeper is held by Luca Marchegiani, with 339 appearances, [ 54 ] while the read for most league appearances is held by Aldo Puccinelli with 339. [ 54 ] The all-time conduct goalscorer for Lazio is Ciro Immobile, with 160 goals [ 55 ] scored, followed by Silvio Piola with 159 goals. [ 54 ] Piola, who played besides with Pro Vercelli, Torino, Juventus and Novara, is besides the highest goalscorer in Serie A history, with 274 goals. [ 56 ] Simone Inzaghi is the all-time top goalscorer in european competitions, with 20 goals. [ 54 ] He is besides one of the five players who scored four goals in a single UEFA Champions League match. [ 57 ] officially, Lazio ‘s highest home attendance is approximately 80,000 for a Serie A pit against Foggia on 12 May 1974, the match that awarded to Lazio their first Scudetto. This is besides the record for the Stadio Olimpico, including matches held by Roma and the Italy national football team. [ 6 ]

Società Sportiva Lazio as a party

In 1998, during Sergio Cragnotti ‘s period in charge as the president, Società Sportiva Lazio S.p.A. became a listed company : latium were the first italian club to do so. [ 58 ] [ 59 ] however, Cragnotti resigned as chair in 2001, after a “ huge fix in the budget ” of the club. [ 60 ] Claudio Lotito, the current president of Lazio, purchased the club from Cragnotti in 2004, but owned fair 26.969 % of shares as the largest shareholders at that clock. It was followed by banking group Capitalia ( and its subsidiaries Mediocredito Centrale, Banca di Roma and Banco di Sicilia ) as the second largest shareholders for 17.717 %. [ 61 ] Capitalia besides hold 49 % venture of Italpetroli ( via Capitalia ‘s subsidiary company Banca di Roma ), the rear company of city rival Roma ( via Italpetroli ‘s subordinate “ read-only memory 2000 ” ). [ 62 ] Lotito late purchased the minority stake from Capitalia. As of 2018, Claudio Lotito owns just over two-thirds of the shares of Lazio. [ 63 ] Lazio is one of only three italian clubs listed on the Borsa Italiana, the others being Juventus and Roma. [ 59 ] [ 64 ] In the by, Lazio was the only one with a single primary contribution holder ( Lotito ). however, following respective capital increases by Roma and Juventus, they besides are significantly owned by a stockholder. According to The Football Money League, published by consultants Deloitte, in the 2004–05 season, Lazio was the twentieth highest earning football club in the world with an calculate tax income of €83 million ; [ 65 ] the 2005 rank of the club was 15th. [ 65 ] however, in 2016 ranking ( the rank used data in 2014–15 season ), Lazio was not in the top 20. [ 66 ] Lazio was one of the few clubs that self-sustain from the fiscal support of a stockholder, and besides systematically make an aggregate net income after every season. Unlike Inter Milan, Roma and Milan, who were sanctioned by UEFA due to breaches of Financial Fair Play, Lazio passed the regulations held by the administrative body with the high achievements. Lotito besides received a loot that joint awarded by Associazione Italiana Allenatori Calcio [ it ] and DGS Sport & Cultura, due to Lazio ‘s fiscal health. [ 67 ] In 2017, the club renewed their sponsorship batch with shirt manufacturer Macron. It is worth €16 million a season, plus variables of about €9 million stemming from league and european competition finishes. [ 68 ]

See besides

References

Sources

  • Melli, Franco and Marco (2005). La storia della Lazio (in Italian). Rome: L’airone Editrice. ISBN 88-7944-725-4.
  • Barbero, Sergio (1999). Lazio. Il lungo volo dell’aquila (in Italian). Graphot. ISBN 88-86906-19-6.
  • Barraco, Egidio (1992). Nella Lazio ho giocato anch’io. Novantanni in biancoazzurro (in Italian). Aldo Pimerano. ISBN 88-85946-09-7.
  • Bocchio, Sandro; Tosco, Giovanni (2000). Dizionario della grande Lazio (in Italian). Newton & Compton. ISBN 88-8289-495-9.
  • Cacciari, Patrizio; Filacchione; Stabile (2004). 1974. Nei ricordi dei protagonisti la storia incredibile della Lazio di Maestrelli (in Italian). Eraclea Libreria Sportiva. ISBN 88-88771-10-7.
  • Chinaglia, Giorgio (1984). Passione Lazio (in Italian). Rome: Lucarini. ISBN 88-7033-051-6.
  • Chiappaventi, Guy (2004). Pistole e palloni. Gli anni Settanta nel racconto della Lazio campione d’Italia (in Italian). Limina. ISBN 88-88551-30-1.
  • Filacchione, Marco (2002). Il volo dell’aquila. Numeri e uomini della grande Lazio (in Italian). Eraclea Libreria Sportiva. ISBN 88-88771-08-5.
  • Martin, Simon (2006). Calcio e fascismo. Lo sport nazionale sotto Mussolini (in Italian). Mondadori. ISBN 88-04-55566-1.
  • Melli, Franco (2000). Cara Lazio (in Italian). Rome: Lucarini. ISBN 88-7033-297-7.
  • Melli, Franco (2000). Saga biancazzurra. La Lazio, Cragnotti, il nuovo potere (in Italian). Rome: Limina. ISBN 88-86713-56-8.
  • Pennacchia, Mario (1994). Lazio patria nostra: storia della società biancoceleste (in Italian). Rome: Abete Edizioni. ISBN 88-7047-058-X.
  • Recanatesi, Franco (2005). Uno più undici. Maestrelli: la vita di un gentiluomo del calcio, dagli anni Trenta allo scudetto del ’74 (in Italian). Rome: L’Airone Editrice. ISBN 88-7944-844-7.
  • Tozzi, Alessandro (2005). La mia Lazio. L’Avventura nel meno nove e altre storie biancocelesti (in Italian). Eraclea Libreria Sportiva. ISBN 88-88771-14-X.
  • Valilutti, Francesco (1997). Breve storia della grande Lazio (in Italian). Rome: Newton & Compton editori. ISBN 88-7983-859-8.

Swansea City A.F.C.

Association football club

football club
Swansea City Association Football Club ( ; Welsh : Clwb Pêl-droed Cymdeithas Dinas Abertawe ) is a professional football club based in Swansea, Wales that plays in the Championship, the second tier of English football. Swansea have played their dwelling matches at the Swansea.com Stadium ( once known as the Liberty Stadium ) since 2005, having previously played at the Vetch Field since the club was founded.

The club was founded in 1912 as Swansea Town and entered into the Southern League, winning the Welsh Cup in their debut season. They were admitted into the Football League in 1920 and won the Third Division South title in 1924–25. They again won the Third Division South title in 1948–49, having been relegated two years previously. They fell into the Fourth Division after relegations in 1965 and 1967. The club changed their name to Swansea City in 1969 to reflect Swansea ‘s raw condition as a city. [ 3 ] They were promoted at the end of the 1969–70 season. The baseball club won three promotions in four seasons to reach the First Division in 1981. It was during the following season they came close to winning the league title, but a refuse then set in near the season ‘s end, before they finished sixth, still a club record. It was from here the golf club suffered a delegating the season after, returning to the Fourth Division by 1986 and then narrowly avoiding relegation to the conference in 2003. The Swansea City Supporters Trust Ltd owns 20 % of the baseball club, [ 4 ] with their interest hailed by Supporters Direct as “ the most high profile example of the engagement of a supporters ‘ reliance in the direct linear of a club ”. [ 5 ] The club ‘s subsequent climb from the fourth class of English football to the top division is chronicled in the 2014 film, Jack to a King – The Swansea Story. In 2011, Swansea were promoted to the Premier League. On 24 February 2013, Swansea beat Bradford City 5–0 to win the 2012–13 Football League Cup ( the contest ‘s highest ever winning margin for the final ), winning the first gear major trophy in the cabaret ‘s history and qualifying for the 2013–14 UEFA Europa League, in which they reached the round of 32 but lost over two legs to Napoli. The club was relegated from the Premier League at the end of the 2017–18 season .

history [edit ]

early years ( 1912–1945 ) [edit ]

The Swansea Town team during its beginning season, 1912–13 The area around Swansea traditionally had been a rugby area, and despite previous attempts by a football baseball club named Swansea Villa, there were no celebrated football clubs until the administration of ‘ Swansea Town AFC’ in the summer of 1912. Following the go of many early South Wales sides, the clubhouse joined the Second Division of the Southern League for the follow season. J. W. Thorpe was the club ‘s first president. A site owned by Swansea Gaslight Co., called Vetch Field due to the vegetables that grew there, was rented to be the club ‘s labor. The club ‘s first gear professional match was a 1–1 draw at the Vetch Field against Cardiff City on 7 September 1912. During that first season the Welsh Cup was won for the first clock time. The Swans beat reigning english champions Blackburn Rovers 1–0 in the first round of the 1914–15 FA Cup, Swansea ‘s finish coming from Ben Beynon. [ 6 ] Following the first World War the Southern League dropped its second Division, and with many clubs dropping out ascribable to fiscal difficulties, the Swans were placed in the First Division. After four seasons in the Southern League, Swansea Town became founder members of the newly Third Division of The Football League in 1920 and then Division Three ( South ) the following season. After five seasons in Division Three ( South ) and a few fail bids for promotion, the Swans reached the Second Division for the first clock in 1925, beating Exeter City 2–1 at home on the final day of the season to win the division. The side had remained unbeaten at home in the league all season – something the next promotion team would emulate over twenty years late. The following season the Swans reached the semi-finals of the FA Cup for the first time, beating Exeter City, Watford, Blackpool, Stoke City, Millwall and Arsenal, before losing 3–0 to eventual cup winners Bolton Wanderers at White Hart Lane. Swans record their highest average attendance during the season of 16,118 for pre-war league games. During the 1926–27 season they beat real Madrid 3–0 on tour. During the 1931–32 season they finished 1st in the league and won the Welsh Cup after beating Wrexham 2–0 away after a replay .
Ivor Allchurch scored 164 goals in 445 appearances for the Swans between 1947–1958 and 1965–1968 After precisely one temper back from wartime football, the Swans finished 21st in the Second Division, and therefore returned to Division Three ( South ) for the first time since 1925. The following season was one of consolidation, however in 1948–1949 the Swans stormed their way to winning the division for the second base time. only one point was dropped at home all season as the feat of the 1925 promotion side was emulated, with the side finishing a wholly seven points ahead of irregular place Reading. Billy McCandless was the director who led the side to promotion, and in doing indeed he completed a rare hat-trick of winning the Third Division ( South ) title with all three South Wales clubs – and without losing a base crippled with Swansea or Cardiff. Following promotion, the Swans had another 15 years of Second Division football to look forward to, however despite what consecutive managers and chairmen were to say, Swansea Town only once during that fourth dimension looked like they could truly challenge for forwarding. That came in the 1955–56 season, when a side containing the likes of Ivor Allchurch, Terry Medwin, Harry Griffiths and Tom Kiley led the table early on in the season, before an injury to Kiley, referred to as the anchor of the side, in mid-november led to a decline in phase. He was never adequately replaced, but despite this and the sale of some of the club ‘s best players, the side remained in contention for promotion until the begin of April. Following a 6–1 succeed over second base rate Leicester City at the Vetch Field at the end of March the side was just two points behind second placed Liverpool with a bet on in pass – however subsequent results were not as encourage, and they finally slipped away to finish tenth. In 1964, the Swans reached a moment FA Cup semi-final, beating Barrow, Sheffield United and Stoke City en path to a celebrated sixth round victory at Anfield. Few gave the Swans, struggling for their lives at the bottom of Division Two, any chance of causing an overturn against the league leaders. But the Swans were 0–2 up at half-time thanks to Jimmy McLaughlin and Eddie Thomas. liverpool turned up the imperativeness in the second gear half, pulling a goal spinal column before being awarded a punishment nine minutes from time. Ronnie Moran had established an excellent record as a punishment taker, but he failed to beat the excellent Noel Dwyer on this juncture. Fellow moment division side Preston North End awaited in the semi-final at Villa Park, but despite taking the moderate through McLaughlin again, the Swans were to be denied by a second one-half punishment and a curiosity goal from closely 40 yards. After flirting with delegating on a few occasions during the former seasons, the Swans ‘ luck last ran out a season belated in 1965, and they were back in the Third Division .

A down coiling ( 1965–1977 ) [edit ]

Following delegating, Trevor Morris, who had been coach since 1958, was sacked and Glyn Davies, a former Swansea actor, was appointed in his place. Davies re-signed the 36-year-old Ivor Allchurch from Cardiff City, but despite winning the Welsh Cup, the season saw some of the club ‘s heaviest defeats, and the director only lasted the season. delegating to Division Four followed in 1967 and Ivor Allchurch retired. The 1967–68 season saw the read attendance of 32,796 at the Vetch Field for an FA Cup Fourth Round match against Arsenal. A calamity struck the baseball club on 20 January 1969 when players Roy Evans and Brian Purcell were killed in a cable car barge in on the direction to a game. [ 7 ] In 1969, the club appoint was changed to Swansea City, and Roy Bentley ‘s side celebrated by securing promotion back to the Third Division. A record run of 19 matches unbeaten provided the foundations for a forwarding challenge in 1971–72, but an amazing guide towards the goal of the season resulted in a mid-table finish. A poor people start the trace temper, combined with falling attendances, saw Bentley leave office, and he was replaced by Harry Gregg. Gregg failed to stop the bunk and the clubhouse was back in the Fourth Division for 1973–74 season. A record low crowd of good 1,358 watched the Swans against Northampton Town, and the surveil season the Swans were forced to apply for re-election to the Football League after a final day defeat at Rochdale condemned them to a 21st-place finish. The application was a success, although by now former player Harry Griffiths had replaced Gregg as coach. Malcolm Struel besides took over as president, having previously been on the control panel, and promised a return to former glories, stating that he would not sell the club ‘s best young talent as previous boards had done .

Meteoric rise and equally rapid fall ( 1977–1986 ) [edit ]

Despite promising performances during the first base half of the 1977–78 season, Harry Griffiths resigned as Swansea City ‘s coach in February 1978, doubting his own ability to take the baseball club any promote. The modern director was early Liverpool, Cardiff City and Wales striker John Toshack. On 1 March 1978, at 28 years previous, Toshack became the youngest coach in the Football League, with Griffiths as his assistant. Thus began a noteworthy climb from the Fourth Division to the top of the entire league. Despite relinquishing his character as director before the end of the season, this was Griffiths ‘ team, and the forwarding from the Fourth Division was largely his doing. During this season, the Swans ‘ record league succeed was achieved ( 8–0 against Hartlepool United ). Before promotion was secured, however, Harry Griffiths died of a center attack on 25 April 1978 before the home game against Scunthorpe United. A farther promotion was achieved adjacent season and the club returned to the Second Division after an absence of 14 years, with Toshack himself coming off the bench to score the winning goal against Chesterfield and frankincense fasten promotion. After a season of consolidation, Swansea City again challenged for promotion and travelled to Preston North End on 2 May 1981 in the cognition that victory would assure them a plaza in the First Division for the first time in the club ‘s history. A 3–1 succeed guaranteed a third base promotion in four seasons and Swansea City joined the footballing elect. The goalscorers on that sidereal day at Deepdale were Tommy Craig, Leighton James and Jeremy Charles. The four-year rise from basement to top division is a record in English football, held jointly with Wimbledon F.C. [ 8 ] Swansea besides won the Welsh Cup that season, qualifying for Europe for the beginning time since the 1965–66 season. [ 9 ] The 1981–82 season began with the repair calculator handing Swansea a first-day home game against Leeds United, which the club promptly won 5–1 with a hat-trick by debutant Bob Latchford. Swansea had swept from the basement division to the exceed of the entire Football League in three years. Victories over Liverpool, Manchester United, Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur followed as the club topped the league on several far occasions. however, injuries to key players took their toll, and the lack of astuteness in the squad meant that the season ended in sixth-place finish up. Two back-to-back relegations followed, and Toshack was sacked. By 1985, the golf club was battling for its very survival on two fronts. Whilst its creditors lined up a high Court hearing with the bearing of liquidating the cabaret, Swansea City had come to rely on a combination of old players and young professionals. Wound up by court ordering in December 1985, Swansea City was saved by local anesthetic businessman Doug Sharpe who took over the run of the clubhouse, although the deepen of possession was not adequate to prevent delegating to the Fourth Division in 1986. [ 10 ] Eight years on from the first promotion under Toshack, the club was spinal column where it had started .

In place of strife ( 1986–1995 ) [edit ]

Swansea won forwarding from the Fourth Division in 1988 – beating Rotherham United and Torquay United over two legs in the inaugural playoffs. They remained in the league ‘s third tier for the following eight seasons – the longest period of stability the club had seen since the 1940s. Under Terry Yorath and then Frank Burrows, the club managed to stay in the Second Division, reach the playoff semi-finals in 1993 and make their first base Wembley Stadium appearance a year late. Burrows guided the Swans to within 180 minutes of Wembley in 1993 – a run of five wins in the concluding six league matches ( all at home ) secured a playoff place, and with five minutes remaining of the inaugural branch of the semi-final against West Bromwich Albion, the Swans were 2–0 up. Andy McFarlane scored an own goal when the ball rebounded off the crossbar then into the net off his stifle, and two early goals in the moment leg gave the Baggies the advantage, until midfielder Micky Mellon was sent off. Burrows brought on Colin West, but he was sent off minutes later, ending any hopes of a Wembley concluding. Although the league campaign the following season did not live up the previous one, chiefly due to the sale of key players, Burrows guided the Swans to Wembley for the foremost clock time in their history for the final of the Autoglass Trophy. Wins over Plymouth Argyle & Exeter City in the group stage followed by wallow over Exeter again, Port Vale, Leyton Orient and Wycombe Wanderers over two legs saw the Swans play Huddersfield Town in a final examination that finished 1–1. The Swans went on to win 3–1 on penalties. In the following season, the cabaret again reached the semi-finals of the Auto Windscreens Shield, finally going out to Birmingham City, and an consequential FA Cup run saw them win at Middlesbrough in a third round replay, before going out to Newcastle United at St James ‘ Park. The 1995–96 season ended with relegation back to the one-third division after eight years. The Swans were doing fine around Christmas time, but a dispatch collapse in the second one-half of the season, including a 7–0 FA Cup frustration at third base division Fulham, 4–0 and 5–1 defeats at Blackpool and Oxford United respectively, led to delegating, despite the arrival of Jan Mølby .

The unmanageable years return ( 1995–2001 ) [edit ]

relegation in 1996 was accompanied by a golf club record of beng managed by four men in the like season. Kevin Cullis was appointed as coach by a consortium wish to buy the club. Cullis, whose previous experience was with non-league clubhouse Cradley Town youth team. Alarmed at developments at the club, Sharpe invoked a contractual clause to cancel the deal and resumed control himself : cullis was promptly sacked after just six days. Cullis ‘s successor was the Dane, Jan Mølby, a former Liverpool player taking his first steps in management. His appointment inescapably prompted comparison with the Toshack earned run average which began closely 20 years early. Despite delegating in 1996, the club reached the concluding of the 1997 Third Division forwarding play-offs but lost to Northampton Town, whose goal came from a re-taken free complain by John Frain in the final minute. Mølby was sacked equitable weeks into the adopt season, with Swansea struggling near the foot of the league. After the initial optimism, the Liverpool connection had not caused history to repeat itself. Alan Cork was appointed as director, but was dismissed after leading the baseball club to its lowest league finish up for 23 years. John Hollins was appointed, and things soon started to improve. In 1999, the club reached the forwarding playoffs, lone to lose in excess time at Scunthorpe United. The season included a one-third round FA Cup victory over Premiership opponents West Ham United, whose team included Frank Lampard, Joe Cole, Rio Ferdinand and John Hartson. Swansea therefore became the beginning bottom division team to defeat a Premiership club in the FA Cup since the re-organisation of the league structure in 1992. The club was promoted in 2000 as Division Three champions, following a championship decider on the concluding day of the season against second-placed Rotherham United. The side conceded good 32 goals during the 1999–2000 season, largely due to the form of excellent centre-back pairing Jason Smith and Matthew Bound, american samoa well as keeper Roger Freestone. During the season the side set a record of nine consecutive league victories, and, during the lapp period, seven back-to-back clean sheets. Striker Walter Boyd besides set an unwanted commemorate of being the fastest substitute always sent off, when he was red-carded for striking a Darlington musician seconds after being brought on and before play had resumed, therefore being formally recorded as zero seconds. promotion was secured courtesy of a 3–0 win over Exeter City at a backpack Vetch Field. however, the following workweek ‘s 1–1 draw at Rotherham United, which confirmed Swansea as Division Three Champions, was overshadowed by the death of athletic supporter Terry Coles, who was trampled to end by a police knight in narrow Millmoor Lane before the crippled. The team were relegated in May 2001, just 12 months after promotion. Hollins had failed to strengthen the side at all during the summer, and despite a decent start, a 5–1 frustration at big-spending Reading in September led to a slide down the table, and the side won good eight games all temper, and entirely Oxford United finished below them. delegating seemed certain following a 5–3 kill at fellow strugglers Luton Town, where Giovanni Savarese scored a hat-trick, however Hollins maintained that the side could stay up, even when 18 points were needed from the final examination six matches, and for two other teams to pick up no more points .

last years at Vetch Field and return to League One ( 2001–2005 ) [edit ]

swansea fans and players celebrate the last league finish to be scored at the Vetch Field In July 2001, following delegating second to Third Division, the club was sold to managing director Mike Lewis for £1. Lewis subsequently sold on his venture to a consortium of australian businessmen behind the Brisbane Lions ( An australian Rules Football team that is based in Brisbane ) football team, fronted by Tony Petty. Seven players were sacked and eight others saw their contracts terminated. During this period Hollins was sacked after a poor startle to the season, and Colin Addison took over as coach. The agitation led to the creation of the Swansea City supporters ‘ trust, which sought to save the club and ultimately guarantee patron representation on the clubhouse ‘s board. The Petty group sold its post in January 2002 after a bitter stand-off with the Mel Nurse consortium, which was supported by the majority of the clubhouse ‘s fans. Jim Moore and Mel Griffin, previously rescuers of Hull City, stepped into the transgress and persuaded Petty to sell to them ( as he had promised to bankrupt the club & make it extinct rather than sell to Nurse ). From there Moore became chair for three weeks giving the “ Mel Nurse Consortium ” time to organize its finances. Having successfully reorganized the finances of Hull City, both Moore and Griffin were believers in clubs belonging in the hands of local people, and indeed believing Nurse ‘s group were best for The Swans, subsequently passed the clubhouse onto Nurses consortium for the fee of £1. Despite problems off the pitch, Addison ‘s side had managed a mid-table position, but he was dismissed in early March, and under Nick Cusack the club slumped to a twentieth placed-finish. Cusack lasted just eight games into the watch temper, and was sacked after a 1–0 frustration at league debutants Boston United had put the Swans on the bottom of the Football League for the foremost time in their 91-year history. He was replaced by Brian Flynn. Swansea City avoided relegation to the Football Conference on the last day of the temper, at the expense of Exeter City, a club then vice-chaired by Mike Lewis. Brian Flynn ‘s side finished 2003–04 10th and reached the fifth round off of the FA Cup for the first time in 24 years, finally losing 2–1 at Tranmere Rovers. Flynn was dismissed and replaced by Kenny Jackett. Jackett lost his first six matches in care, ending any hope of a play-off place. The succeed season Jackett recruited a number of new defensive players and set a record of seven straight home clean and jerk sheets, all victories. The Swans ‘ last season at the Vetch Field saw the club gain promotion on the survive day of the temper, clinching a 3rd-placed finish with a 1–0 gain away to Bury. Their stopping point league game at their old ground was a 1–0 gain over Shrewsbury Town, with the last game of any sort being a 2–1 winnings against Wrexham in the final of the 2005 FAW Premier Cup .

Move to Liberty Stadium and return to top trajectory ( 2005–2011 ) [edit ]

The club moved to the newfangled Liberty Stadium during the summer of 2005. The first competitive game was a 1–0 victory against Tranmere Rovers in August 2005. In their first temper back in League One, Swansea, after beating Brentford in the semi-finals, lost on penalties to Barnsley in the final examination at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff. That lapp temper, Swansea won the Football League Trophy for the first clock since 1994, and the FAW Premier Cup for a moment consecutive year. In the following season Jackett resigned as coach in mid-season to be replaced by Roberto Martínez. Martínez ‘s arrival saw an improvement in form, but Swansea missed out on the play-offs again. The follow season, an 18-game unbeaten run helped them to the League One title. The cabaret amassed a sum of 92 points over the path of the temper, the highest ever by a Welsh club in the Football League. Five swansea players were in the PFA Team of the Year, including the class ‘s 29-goal exceed scorekeeper Jason Scotland. That same season Swansea lost on penalties to Milton Keynes Dons in the sphere final of the Football League Trophy .
Swansea City lionize promotion to the Premier League at Wembley Stadium Upon returning to the second gear grade of English football after 24 years Swansea City finished the 2008–09 season in one-eighth invest, and missed out on the play-offs the following season by a single point. After 63 wins in 126 games for Swansea City, Martínez left for Wigan Athletic on 15 June 2009 with his tenure returning precisely 26 losses in that time. He was replaced by portuguese Paulo Sousa. Sousa subsequently left Swansea to take bang at Leicester City on 5 July 2010, lasting barely one year and 13 days in South Wales. however, fair before the deviation of Sousa, on 15 May 2010, Swansea player Besian Idrizaj suffered a center approach in his native Austria while on international duty. The club retired the number 40 shirt in his memory, and the players wore shirts dedicated to Idrizaj after their victory in the play-off final. Northern Irishman Brendan Rodgers took charge for the 2010–11 season. He guided the club to a third-placed ending and reservation for the Championship play-offs. After beating Nottingham Forest 3–1 on aggregate in the semi-final they defeated Reading 4–2 in the final at Wembley Stadium, with Scott Sinclair scoring a hat-trick. [ 11 ]

Premier League and Europe ( 2011–2018 ) [edit ]

By being promoted to the Premier League for the 2011–12 season, Swansea became the first gear Welsh team to play in the part since its geological formation in 1992. [ 12 ] Swansea signed Danny Graham from Watford for a then-record fee of £3.5 million. [ 13 ] They defeated Arsenal, Liverpool and Manchester City, the eventual champions, at home plate during the season. [ 14 ] Swansea finished their debut Premier League season in 11th, but at the end of the season Brendan Rodgers left to manage Liverpool. [ 15 ] He was replaced by Michael Laudrup for the 2012–13 Premier League temper, which was the club ‘s centennial temper. [ 15 ] Laudrup ‘s first league game ended in a 0–5 victory over Queens Park Rangers away at Loftus Road. [ 16 ] Swansea then beat West Ham United 3–0 at the Liberty Stadium, with Michu scoring his third goal in two games. [ 17 ] This saw Swansea top of the Premier League ; it was the first time since October 1981 the team had been at the acme of the acme tier. [ 17 ]
The Swansea City A.F.C. centennial cap used during the 2012–13 season On 15 October 2012, the cabaret announced a net income of £14.2 million after their first season in the Premier League. [ 18 ] On 1 December, Swansea picked up a 0–2 away win against Arsenal, with Michu scoring twice during the last minutes of the game, in Swansea ‘s first win at Arsenal in three decades. [ 19 ] Michu ended the season as the club ‘s top scorer in all competitions, with 22 goals. [ 20 ]

Read more: Lille OSC

On 24 February 2013, Swansea beat Bradford City 0–5 in the League Cup final en road to the biggest win in the concluding of the rival. [ 21 ] [ 22 ] This triumph, in a phonograph record victory, was Swansea ‘s first major while of silverware and qualified them for the 2013–14 UEFA Europa League. Swansea finished the season in ninth rate in the Premier League, improving upon the league standing achieved in the former temper. On 11 July, Swansea paid a club record transportation fee of £12 million to secure the sign of striker Wilfried Bony from Vitesse Arnhem ; Bony was the leading goalscorer in the 2012–13 Eredivisie with 31 goals and was named Dutch Player of the Year. [ 23 ]
Michael Laudrup led Swansea to the Europa League and a top half finish in the Premier League Swansea enjoyed initial success in Europe, beating spanish side Valencia 3–0 at the Mestalla Stadium in September 2013. [ 24 ] On 3 November 2013, Swansea lost the first Welsh bowler hat in the Premier League to Cardiff City following a 1–0 defeat. [ 25 ] In February 2014, Laudrup was dismissed from the club after a poor people run of form. Defender Garry Monk, a Swansea player since 2004, was named as his substitute. [ 26 ] In Monk ‘s first game in charge, Swansea beat cardiff 3–0 at the Liberty Stadium on 8 February 2014. [ 27 ] Despite holding Rafael Benítez ‘s Napoli to a 0–0 withdraw in the first base leg of the Europa League Round of 32, Swansea exited the competition after losing 3–1 in the second peg at the Stadio San Paolo on 27 February 2014. [ 28 ] In January 2015, Wilfried Bony was sold to Manchester City for a record sale of £25 million, with add-ons reportedly leading to £28 million. [ 29 ] This batch eclipsed the record tip received from Liverpool for Joe Allen at £15 million. [ 29 ] At the time of the sale, Bony was the club ‘s crown scorer with 34 goals in all competitions, and the Premier League ‘s top scorer for the 2014 calendar year, with 20 goals. [ 29 ] [ 30 ] Swansea City finished one-eighth in the Premier League at the conclusion of the 2014–15 season with 56 points, their highest position and points haul for a Premier League season, and second highest ending in the top flight of all time. [ 31 ] During the season, they produced league doubles over Arsenal and Manchester United, becoming alone the third base team in Premier League history to achieve that feat. [ 32 ] On 9 December 2015, director Garry Monk was sacked after one succeed in football team matches. [ 33 ] The club, after a period with Alan Curtis as caretaker director for the third base prison term, chose the italian former Udinese Calcio coach Francesco Guidolin. During the 2016–17 preseason, Swansea City came under raw possession by an american consortium led by Jason Levien and Steven Kaplan, who bought a controlling concern in the baseball club in July 2016. [ 34 ] Chairman Huw Jenkins remained at the baseball club. [ 34 ] On 3 October 2016, Guidolin was sacked and replaced by american english coach Bob Bradley. The survival of Bradley marked the first meter a Premier League golf club had ever hired an american director. [ 35 ] Bradley himself was sacked after equitable 85 days in charge ; he won only two of his 11 games, conceded 29 goals, and left with a winnings percentage of barely 18.1 %. [ 36 ]
On 3 January 2017, Bayern Munich adjunct coach Paul Clement agreed to take agitate of the team, replacing Bradley. [ 37 ] Following Clement ‘s arrival, Nigel Gibbs and Claude Makélélé were appointed his assistant coaches and Karl Halabi was appointed Head of Physical Performance. [ 38 ] During the remainder of the 2016–17 season, Clement led Swansea to win 26 points from 18 games, securing their survival on 14 May. [ 39 ] only three anterior teams had climbed from bottom of the table at Christmas to escape delegating, and only one anterior team was able to escape relegation while having three managers during a season. [ 40 ] On 6 November 2017, assistant passenger car Claude Makélélé left the club to join belgian side Eupen. [ 41 ] He was replaced by long-run Swansea player Leon Britton. [ 42 ] A poor first one-half of the 2017–18 temper saw Swansea sitting bottom of the mesa after 18 league games, which led to Clement being sacked on 20 December 2017, leaving the club four points adrift of safety. [ 43 ] Towards the end of his tenure, Clement was criticised by a section of Swansea supporters for playing “ boring ” and “ minus ” football, questioning his tactical decisions with the Swans being the lowest scorers in the Premier League at the clock time of his dismissal. [ 44 ] [ 45 ] [ 46 ] He was replaced by Portuguese coach Carlos Carvalhal. [ 47 ] Despite straight league home plate wins against Liverpool ( 1–0 ), [ 48 ] Arsenal ( 3–1 ), [ 49 ] Burnley ( 1–0 ), [ 50 ] and West Ham ( 4–1 ), [ 51 ] Swansea were winless in their survive nine league games ( losing five ) under Carvalhal, leaving them in 18th place on the final sidereal day of the season. [ 52 ] During the temper, president Huw Jenkins and the club ‘s american owners were criticised by Swansea fans and pundits for inadequate transfer windows and the fire of managers ; [ 53 ] Alan Shearer blamed the Swansea board for moving aside from the style of play found under previous managers Brendan Rodgers and Roberto Martínez. [ 52 ]

reelect to the Championship ( 2018–present ) [edit ]

Swansea City were relegated on 13 May 2018, following a 2–1 defeat to already-relegated Stoke City. [ 52 ] On 11 June 2018, Graham Potter was announced as the club ‘s new director, replacing Carvalhal. [ 54 ] On 2 February 2019, Huw Jenkins resigned as chair amid increasing criticism over the club ‘s sale to the american english consortium in 2016 and the golf club ‘s subsequent relegation from the Premier League. [ 55 ] He was replaced with Trevor Birch. The first season back in the Championship produced a 10th-place finish up, including a quarter-final appearance in the FA Cup. however, Potter left at the end of the season to manage Premier League clubhouse Brighton. [ 56 ] He was succeeded by former England U17 coach Steve Cooper, with Mike Marsh joining him as his adjunct. [ 57 ] In September 2019, Cooper was named EFL Championship Manager of The Month, with Swansea City sitting lead of the table after an unbeaten beginning month ; this was Swansea ‘s best start to a season in 41 years. [ 58 ] On the concluding sidereal day of the season, Swansea beat Reading 4–1 to finish sixth, moving into the play-offs ahead of Nottingham Forest on goal difference, [ 59 ] but were late defeated by Brentford in the semi-final second stage. [ 60 ]
Swansea ‘s crest for the 2021–22 season. At the end of the 2020–21 temper, Swansea finished 4th in the league and secured a play-off place for a second back-to-back season. [ 61 ] Swansea progressed to the 2021 EFL Championship play-off Final after defeating Barnsley 2–1 on aggregate, but lost to Brentford at Wembley Stadium. [ 62 ] For the 2021–22 season, the cabaret unveiled a modernized adaptation of the original cap to mark the fortieth anniversary of the Swans ‘ first forwarding to the exceed flight in 1981. [ 63 ] After Steve Cooper left the club, Russell Martin became head coach. [ 64 ] Martin spoke with early Swansea boss Graham Potter before accepting the job. [ 64 ] He said, “ I know the fanbase and what they expect in terms of the modern Swansea Way, that started under Roberto Martínez and continued under Brendan Rodgers and Michael Laudrup. We, as a coaching team, are identical much aligned with that. It excites me. ” [ 64 ]

stadium [edit ]

The Vetch Field was the home of Swansea City for 93 years Before Swansea Town was established, children would play football on waste anchor in which a plant, called “ vetch “ ( a type of legume ) was grown. The locate was owned by Swansea Gaslight Company in 1912, but was deemed excess to requirements at the Gas Company. So Swansea Town moved in when they were established in 1912. [ 65 ] The earth primitively held 12,000, but hit its flower attendance of 32,786 in an 1967 FA cup Fifth Round against Arsenal. The last league goal always scored at the Vetch was scored by hadrian Forbes, on 30 April 2005, as Swansea outwit Shrewsbury Town 1–0. With a quickly deteriorating Vetch Field, Swansea looked to relocate. As Swansea and the Ospreys did not have the capital to invest in a new stadium, the Swansea City Council and a developer-led consortium submitted a proposal for a sustainable “ bowl ” venue for 20,520 seats on a site to the west of the river on the site of the Morfa Stadium, which the Council owned. It was funded by a 355,000 foot retail park on land to the east of the river. The final examination prize of the development being in excess of £50 million. On 23 July 2005, The Liberty Stadium was formally opened as Swansea faced Fulham in a friendly game. [ 66 ]
The Liberty Stadium became Swansea City ‘s family ground from 2005, and was renamed the Swansea.com Stadium in 2021 The Liberty Stadium capacity was 20,532 though has been increased to 20,750. [ citation needed ] The highest attendance recorded at the stadium came against Arsenal on 31 October 2015 with 20,937 spectators, [ 67 ] beating the previous record of 20,845. The stadium has besides hosted three Welsh external football matches ; the first being a 0–0 pull with Bulgaria in 2006, [ 68 ] the second gear a 2–1 frustration to Georgia in 2008 and a 2–0 win over Switzerland on 7 October 2011. The beginning international goal to be scored at the Liberty Stadium was a 25-yard attempt from Welsh international Jason Koumas. [ 69 ] On 1 July 2012, it was widely reported in national media that Swansea City were beginning the design phase for expanding the Liberty Stadium by approximately 12,000 seats. This plan would be conditional on a successful moment temper in the Premier League and could cost up to £15 million ; the increase would result in a capacitance of approximately 32,000 seats. [ 70 ] Later that lapp year, the board of directors announced that planning applications were to be put advancing to the council authority, making the Liberty Stadium the largest sportsclub-owned stadium in Wales. [ 71 ] The Liberty Stadium was renamed the Swansea.com Stadium on 9 August 2021, following a 10-year list rights agreement. [ 72 ]

Rivalries [edit ]

Swansea City ‘s main rivals are Cardiff City, with the competition described as among the most hostile in british football. [ 73 ] Matches between these two clubs are known as the South Wales derbies and are normally one of the highlights of the season for both sets of supporters. It was only from the late 1960s that the competition became cross off. Before then fans of the two clubs frequently had a degree of affection for their Welsh neighbor team. [ 74 ] Swansea City ‘s early rivals are Newport County and to a lesser extent Bristol City and Bristol Rovers. however, Swansea identical rarely meet Newport as they are presently separated by two divisions, while the two clubs share a reciprocal competition with Cardiff City. swansea have won 36 of the 106 competitive meetings, compared to Cardiff ‘s 43, who besides have the biggest consequence between the two sides with Swansea losing 5–0 in 1965, with a farther 27 reap ; to this day, neither team has done the bivalent. Following Swansea City ‘s promotion to the Championship, the clubs were drawn in the League Cup which would be the first meet between both sides for nine years. [ 75 ] Swansea City won the necktie with a solitary confinement goal from a deflected free-kick taken by Jordi Gómez. The match saw sets of supporters from both clubs clash with police after the match. [ 76 ] The adjacent two league games both finished in 2–2 draws. [ 77 ] [ 78 ] however, the bowler hat game at Ninian Park was marred with controversy as reviewer Mike Dean was struck by a coin from a Cardiff City assistant. In the 2009–10 season, Swansea beat cardiff 3–2 at the Liberty Stadium in November, before losing 2–1 in Cardiff in April after a late Michael Chopra fall upon. With Swansea and Cardiff both pushing for promotion to the Premier League, the first bowler hat at the newfangled Cardiff City Stadium, and the first base Cardiff win in nine meetings between the sides, was billed as being the biggest south Wales bowler hat of all meter, in esteem to the league positions of the teams and how close it came to the end of the season. Despite their promise league positions leading up to the bowler hat, neither side gained forwarding at the end of that crusade, and indeed the South Wales bowler hat was once again played out at Championship level during the 2010–11 season – Swansea beating Cardiff 1–0 away with a deep winner from then on-loan Marvin Emnes before losing their home bet on due to a late mint from Craig Bellamy. Following Swansea ‘s promotion to the Premier League at the end of the 2010–11 season, the South Wales bowler hat was again put on hiatus. It would be two seasons before the sides met once more, this fourth dimension on the global stage of the Premier League. On 3 November 2013, Cardiff took the boast rights in the first ever Premier League South Wales bowler hat, enjoying a 1–0 gain courtesy of ex-Swan Steven Caulker at the Cardiff City Stadium. The render fastness for that temper took place on 8 February 2014 at Swansea ‘s Liberty Stadium, a match in which interim player-manager Garry Monk would make his managerial debut following the dismissal of Michael Laudrup. The Swans took retaliation for the defeat earlier in the season with a convincing 3–0 winnings. The sides met again during the 2019–20 season in the Sky Bet Championship ; Swansea won 1–0 in the first fixture at the Liberty Stadium. In the 2020/2021, Jamal Lowe scored a pair in a 2-0 Swansea succeed. [ 79 ]

Honours [edit ]

Swansea won the League Cup in 2013, their foremost major trophy in England Swansea City ‘s first trophy was the Welsh Cup, which they won as Swansea Town in 1913. Their first league award came in 1925, when they won the 1924–25 Football League Third Division South style. Since then Swansea have gone on to win the League Cup once, the Football League Trophy doubly and the Welsh Cup a far nine times. They have besides qualified for UEFA Cup Winners ‘ Cup seven times and the UEFA Europa League once. Swansea City ‘s honours include the surveil : [ 80 ] The Football League
Domestic Cup Competition

Statistics and records [edit ]

[20]Gylfi Sigurðsson is Swansea’s most expensive sale; he was the club’s top scorer in the Premier League, with 34 goals Wilfred Milne holds the record for Swansea appearances, having played 586 matches between 1920 and 1937, close followed by Roger Freestone with 563 between 1991 and 2004. [ 81 ] The player who has won the most international caps while at the clubhouse is Ashley Williams with 50 for Wales. The goalscoring commemorate is held by Ivor Allchurch, with 166 goals, scored between 1947 and 1958 and between 1965 and 1968. [ 82 ] Cyril Pearce holds the records for the most goals scored in a season, in 1931–32, with 35 league goals in the Second Division and 40 goals in entire. [ 65 ] The club ‘s widest victory margin was 12–0, a scoreline which they achieved once in the european Cup Winners Cup, against Sliema in 1982. [ 65 ] [ 83 ] They have lost by an eight-goal allowance on two occasions, once in the FA Cup, beaten 0–8 by Liverpool in 1990 and once in the european Cup Winners Cup, beaten 0–8 by AS Monaco in 1991. [ 84 ] Swansea ‘s 8–1 gain against Notts County in the FA Cup in 2018 is their largest winning margin of the contest, and the largest winning margin at their home grind, the Liberty Stadium. [ 85 ] Swansea ‘s home attendance record was set at the fourth-round FA Cup connect against Arsenal on 17 February 1968, with 32,796 fans attending the Vetch Field. [ 65 ] [ 86 ] The club broke their transfer record to re-sign André Ayew from West Ham United in January 2018 for a tip of £18 million. [ 87 ] The most expensive sale is Gylfi Sigurðsson who joined Everton in August 2017 for a fee believed to be £45 million. [ 88 ] [ 89 ]

european record [edit ]

Swansea City’s scores are given first in all scorelines.

Players [edit ]

stream team [edit ]

As of 3 September 2021[104]

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

Out on lend [edit ]

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

go to bed numbers [edit ]

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

Non-playing personnel [edit ]

club officials [edit ]

As of 25 September 2021

On 22 July 2016, Jason Levien and Steve Kaplan led a consortium of american english businessmen who bought a 68 % post in the club. [ 34 ]

First-team staff [edit ]

As of 25 September 2021[107]

celebrated managers [edit ]

There have been forty-four permanent managers ( of whom six have been player-managers ), and four caretaker managers of Swansea City since the appointment of the clubhouse ‘s beginning professional director, Walter Whittaker in 1912. [ 108 ] [ 109 ] In the golf club ‘s first season, Whittaker led Swansea to their first Welsh Cup gain. [ 65 ] The club ‘s longest-serving director, in terms of tenure, was Haydn Green, who held the status for eight years, four months and 14 days, spanning the entirety of World War II. [ 110 ] Trevor Morris, who oversaw the most games at Swansea, was besides the inaugural director to lead a Welsh club in Europe, qualifying for the 1961–62 Cup Winners ‘ Cup. [ 65 ] [ 111 ] John Toshack, Swansea City ‘s most successful coach with three league promotions and three Welsh Cup wins, led the club to their highest league finish, sixth locate in the 1981–82 First Division. [ 65 ] Appointed in February 1996, the Dane Jan Mølby became Swansea City ‘s first alien director and took Swansea to the 1996–97 Division Three play-off final, only to lose to a last-minute goal. [ 65 ] [ 112 ] In 2011, Swansea City achieved forwarding to the Premier League under Brendan Rodgers, becoming the first Welsh team to play in the division since its formation in 1992. [ 113 ] During Swansea City ‘s centennial year ( 2012–13 ), the club won the League Cup for the first time under Michael Laudrup, the first major trophy in Swansea ‘s 100-year history. [ 114 ]

References [edit ]

  • Official website
  • Swans Academy – Official Swansea City academy site
  • Swans Commercial – Official Swansea City commercial site

mugwump sites [edit ]

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Monetary developments in the euro area: October 2021

  • Annual growth rate of broad monetary aggregate M3 increased to 7.7% in October 2021 from 7.5% in September (revised from 7.4%)
  • Annual growth rate of narrower monetary aggregate M1, comprising currency in circulation and overnight deposits, decreased to 10.7% in October from 11.1% in September
  • Annual growth rate of adjusted loans to households stood at 4.1% in October, unchanged from previous month
  • Annual growth rate of adjusted loans to non-financial corporations increased to 2.5% in October from 2.1% in September

Components of the broad monetary aggregate M3

The annual growth rate of the broad monetary aggregate M3 increased to 7.7 % in October 2021 from 7.5 % in September, averaging 7.7 % in the three months up to October. The components of M3 showed the come developments. The annual increase rate of the narrower aggregate M1, which comprises currency in circulation and nightlong deposits, decreased to 10.7 % in October from 11.1 % in September. The annual growth rate of short-run deposits other than overnight deposits ( M2-M1 ) was -1.6 % in October, compared with -2.5 % in September. The annual growth pace of marketable instruments ( M3-M2 ) increased to 11.1 % in October from 6.8 % in September .

Chart 1

monetary aggregates
( annual growth rates )

Data for monetary aggregates
Looking at the components ‘ contributions to the annual increase rate of M3, the narrower aggregate M1 contributed 7.6 share points ( down from 7.8 percentage points in September ), short-run deposits early than overnight deposits ( M2-M1 ) contributed -0.4 share point ( up from -0.6 share decimal point ) and marketable instruments ( M3-M2 ) contributed 0.6 percentage point ( up from 0.3 percentage charge ).

From the position of the holding sectors of deposits in M3, the annual growth rate of deposits placed by households decreased to 6.5 % in October from 7.0 % in September, while the annual growth rate of deposits placed by non-financial corporations increased to 7.4 % in October from 7.1 % in September. finally, the annual emergence rate of deposits placed by non-monetary fiscal corporations ( excluding indemnity corporations and pension funds ) increased to 18.2 % in October from 14.9 % in September .

Counterparts of the broad monetary aggregate M3

As a contemplation of changes in the items on the monetary fiscal institution ( MFI ) consolidated balance wheel sheet early than M3 ( counterparts of M3 ), the annual growth rate of M3 in October 2021 can be broken down as follows : accredit to general government contributed 4.3 share points ( down from 4.5 share points in September ), credit to the private sector contributed 3.7 share points ( up from 3.4 percentage points ), longer-term fiscal liabilities contributed 0.2 share point ( down from 0.3 percentage point ), net external assets contributed -0.8 share point ( up from -1.0 share point ), and the remaining counterparts of M3 contributed 0.4 percentage sharpen ( up from 0.3 share point ) .

Chart 2

contribution of the M3 counterparts to the annual emergence rate of M3

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( percentage points )

Data for contribution of the M3 counterparts to the annual growth rate of M3

Credit to euro area residents

As regards the dynamics of recognition, the annual emergence rate of sum credit to euro area residents stood at 5.6 % in October 2021, unchanged from the previous month. The annual growth rate of credit to cosmopolitan politics decreased to 10.5 % in October from 11.0 % in September, while the annual growth rate of recognition to the secret sector increased to 3.7 % in October from 3.4 % in September.

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The annual increase pace of adjusted loans to the private sector ( i.e. adjusted for lend sales, securitisation and fanciful cash pooling ) increased to 3.4 % in October from 3.2 % in September. Among the borrowing sectors, the annual growth pace of adjusted loans to households stood at 4.1 % in October, unchanged from the previous month, while the annual growth rate of adjusted loans to non-financial corporations increased to 2.5 % in October from 2.1 % in September.

Chart 3

adjust loans to the secret sector
( annual growth rates )

Data for adjusted loans to the private sector

Notes:

  • Data in this press release are adjusted for seasonal and end-of-month calendar effects, unless stated otherwise.
  • “Private sector” refers to euro area non-MFIs excluding general government.
  • Hyperlinks in the main body of the press release and in annex tables lead to data that may change with subsequent releases as a result of revisions. Figures shown in annex tables are a snapshot of the data as at the time of the current release.

Paris Saint-Germain F.C.

not to be confused with Paris FC Professional football club based in Paris, France

Football cabaret

Paris Saint-Germain Football Club ( french pronunciation : ​ [ paʁi sɛ̃ ʒɛʁmɛ̃ ] ), normally referred to as Paris Saint-Germain, PSG, Paris or Paris SG, is a professional football club based in Paris, France. They compete in Ligue 1, the top division of french football. France ‘s most successful club, they have won over 40 official honours, including nine league titles and one major european trophy. Their home plate flat coat is the Parc des Princes. PSG were founded in 1970, following the amalgamation of Paris FC and Stade Saint-Germain. The club was split into two in 1972, with PSG being relegated to the Division 3, before returning to the Division 1 in 1974. The Parisians won their first major honor, the french Cup, in 1982 and their beginning Division 1 style in 1986. The 1990s was among the most successful periods in PSG ‘s history ; they claimed a second league title, three french Cups, two French League Cups, two french Super Cups and the UEFA Cup Winners ‘ Cup in 1996. After suffering a decline in fortunes during the 2000s, the Red and Blues have enjoyed a revival since 2011 with increased fiscal back, achieving alone dominance in domestic competitions, winning seven league titles and twenty dollar bill home cups and became the only beginning french men ‘s team to win the domestic triple and the domestic quadruple on multiple occasions. PSG have besides become a regular feature in the UEFA Champions League, reaching their first gear final in 2020. Paris SG have the most back-to-back seasons playing in France ‘s top trajectory and are one of two french clubs to have won a major european claim. They are the most popular football club in France and one of the most widely supported teams in the worldly concern. PSG ‘s home kit colours are crimson, blasphemous, and white, and their crown features the Eiffel Tower and a fleur-de-lis. PSG have a longstanding competition with Olympique de Marseille ; the duet contest French football ‘s most ill-famed peer, Le Classique. Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, the Emir of Qatar, owns PSG through closed shareholders Qatar Sports Investments ( QSI ), which purchased the cabaret in 2011. The coup d’etat made PSG the richest club in France and one of the wealthiest in the earth. As of the 2019–20 season, PSG have the seventh-highest tax income in the footballing global with an annual tax income of €541m according to Deloitte, and are the earth ‘s ninth-most valuable football club, worth $ 2.5bn according to Forbes .

history

creation and separate ( 1970–1974 )

In the summer of 1970, an ambitious group of businessmen decided to create a major team in the french capital. [ 1 ] [ 2 ] Guy Crescent and Pierre-Étienne Guyot chose to merge their newly formed side, Paris Football Club, with Stade Saint-Germain of Henri Patrelle after the team from Saint-Germain-en-Laye, 15km west of Paris, were promoted to Ligue 2. [ 2 ] [ 3 ] Real Madrid played a large character in the initiation of Paris Saint-Germain. [ 4 ] The three men were stuck with the fiscal feasibility of the visualize until they met Real ‘s president Santiago Bernabéu. [ 4 ] [ 5 ] Bernabéu told them that starting a crowdfunding crusade was the best solution to establish a new team. [ 4 ] After a request was signed by 20,000 people, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club were formally formed on 12 August 1970. [ 1 ] [ 6 ] For the first time in french football history, the fans had financially contributed in the make of a football clubhouse. [ 4 ] The new capital club built a substantial fanbase thanks to the fusion and benefited enormously from an improved team. [ 7 ] [ 8 ] Led by Jean Djorkaeff, the clubhouse ‘s first star, PSG won promotion to Division 1 and claimed the 1970–71 french Division 2 title in its first gear season. [ 2 ] [ 9 ] Following a finespun fiscal situation, the Paris City Council offered to pay the cabaret ‘s debt and in return demanded them to adopt the more parisian name of “ Paris Football Club. ” [ 2 ] After PSG president Henri Patrelle refused the name change and fiscal support was withdrawn, the clubhouse rip in 1972. [ 2 ] [ 8 ] Paris FC remained in the top tier, while PSG were administratively relegated to Division 3. [ 2 ] [ 10 ]

beginning major honours and decline ( 1974–1991 )

PSG took flight when fashion architect Daniel Hechter took over. [ 1 ] curtly before the get down of the 1973–74 campaign, he replaced Henri Patrelle as president of the united states and named Francis Borelli as vice-president. [ 5 ] [ 11 ] Besides offering his fiscal support to the club, Hechter besides designed PSG ‘s classic home equip. [ 5 ] [ 12 ] Following back-to-back promotions, under french legend Just Fontaine, Paris Saint-Germain promptly returned to the premier division in 1974, ironically at the lapp time as Paris FC slipped into the division below, and moved into the Parc des Princes, which up until that point had been the dwelling stadium of PFC. [ 2 ] [ 13 ] Since then, PSG have never abandoned the exceed fledge of french football nor the Parc. [ 14 ] Before that, PSG had been playing at respective grounds including the Stade Municipal Georges Lefèvre, the Stade Jean-Bouin, the Stade Bauer, and even the Parc des Princes a few times that season despite the reluctance of PFC. [ 3 ] [ 15 ] Chaired by Daniel Hechter, the Parisians failed to win any silverware in the 1970s but began their custom of brilliant Coupe de France runs, established themselves as a top-half team in Division 1 and attracted several prestigious players, including Jean-Pierre Dogliani, Mustapha Dahleb and Carlos Bianchi. [ 2 ] [ 8 ] After Hechter was banned for life from football by the french Football Federation in January 1978, for running a corruption scheme involving slate sales at Parc des Princes, Francis Borelli, who had been vice-president until then, became the raw emboss of the Île-de-France club. [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 5 ] The club ‘s trophy cabinet welcomed its beginning major silverware with the avail of star topology signings Joël Bats, Dominique Bathenay, Safet Sušić and Dominique Rocheteau, aboard PSG Academy graduate Luis Fernandez, who steered the capital side to two back-to-back french Cup titles in 1982 and 1983. [ 1 ] [ 16 ] [ 1 ] [ 2 ] These successes opened Paris the doors to Europe, [ 9 ] including their impressive continental debut in the 1982–83 european Cup Winners ‘ Cup, [ 17 ] which saw them reach the quarter-finals of the tournament. [ 17 ] PSG won its inaugural league championship in 1986. Led by Sušić Joël Bats, Luis Fernández and Dominique Rocheteau, the Red and Blues dominated the championship from start to finish, going a memorable 26 matches without defeat towards the style. [ 2 ] [ 18 ] The follow-up to the league entitle was not as glorious though. [ 18 ] PSG finished one-seventh in the 1986–87 french Division 1 and their first UEFA Champions League appearance that season was a complete bankruptcy. They were knocked out by minnows Vítkovice in the beginning round of the 1986–87 european Cup. [ 18 ] [ 19 ] The following year, PSG avoided relegation on the final examination match of the 1987–88 season after a 4–1 succeed over Lens at the Parc des Princes. [ 8 ] [ 18 ] Highly indebted, the baseball club briefly bounced spinal column, fighting for the 1988–89 league crown with Marseille, before going into refuse. [ 18 ] [ 20 ]

Canal+ takeover and gold era ( 1991–1998 )

The takeover by television receiver giants Canal+ in 1991 revitalized Paris Saint-Germain as they became one of the richest clubs in France. [ 1 ] [ 5 ] Canal+ wiped out PSG ‘s huge debt and appointed Michel Denisot, diarist on the distribution channel, as club president of the united states in place of Francis Borelli. [ 5 ] [ 21 ] now enjoying unplayful investment, the Red and Blues were able to set their sights steadily higher : they had to qualify for european competitions in their beginning season and become french champions within three years. [ 2 ] [ 21 ] In consequence, Canal+ increased the golf club ‘s budget from 90 to 120 million francs in order to build a solid police squad for the 1991–92 temper. [ 2 ] [ 21 ] The revolution began with the date of celebrated coach Artur Jorge, celebrated for leading Porto to the 1986–87 european Cup trophy. The cabaret then embarked on a outgo spree, signing brazilian stars Ricardo and Valdo ampere well as prove french players Paul Le Guen, Laurent Fournier, Patrick Colleter and prolific liberian striker George Weah. [ 21 ] The 1992–93 temper besides marked the beginning of Le Classique, the competition between Paris Saint-Germain and Olympique de Marseille, as both teams battled each early on the field for the 1992–93 french Division 1 crown. [ 21 ] PSG finished runner-up after losing both games against Marseille. [ 22 ] [ 23 ] In the second match between the two clubs, entirely three days after winning the 1992–93 UEFA Champions League, league leaders Marseille welcomed closest challengers PSG in a catch that would determine the deed. [ 23 ] After Marseille won their fifth consecutive championship, Bernard Tapie and Marseille were found guilty of match-fixing in what became known as the french football bribery scandal. [ 24 ] [ 25 ] The french Football Federation stripped Marseille of their entitle and offered it to second-placed PSG, who refused it because club owners Canal+ thought that claiming the trophy would anger their subscribers back in Marseille. [ 23 ] [ 26 ] As a result, the 1992–93 claim remained unattributed, with Canal+ even refused letting the capital club enter in future class ‘s Champions League after UEFA excluded Marseille from the competition. rather, Monaco, who finish up third in Ligue 1 took the Champions League blemish rather. [ 26 ] Considered the golf club ‘s aureate era, the Parisians won nine trophies and reached five straight european semi-finals during the 1990s, including their first UEFA Champions League last-four appearance and two at the like stagecoach of the UEFA Cup. [ 2 ] [ 9 ] [ 21 ] PSG ‘s crowning glory came in the 1996 UEFA Cup Winners ‘ Cup Final with caption Luis Fernandez now as coach. [ 27 ] Bruno Ngotty scored the only goal of the pit to defeat Rapid Wien and make Paris the second french club to always clinch a major european tournament and the youngest baseball club in history to win a european title at 24 years of being. [ 28 ] [ 29 ] The postdate temper, PSG finished runner-up in the 1996 UEFA Super Cup and 1997 UEFA Cup Winners ‘ Cup Final. [ 30 ] [ 31 ] On the domestic view, results were equitable as hearty, with Paris celebrating a second league title, three french Cups, two French League Cups and just ampere many french Super Cup wins. [ 2 ] [ 9 ] [ 21 ]

Crisis modality and relegation battles ( 1998–2011 )

PSG then went into descent following years of mismanagement. [ 9 ] In the summer 1999, PSG spent heavily on fresh players signing Nicolas Anelka, Peter Luccin and Stéphane Dalmat as part of the “ PSG Banlieue ” project of its stockholder Canal+, with the goal of winning Ligue 1 and performing a hearty UEFA Champions League campaign. [ 9 ] In 2002, the club faced a massive fiscal loss with a deficit of €65 million, leading Canal+ to fire Luis Fernandez as coach and Laurent Perpère as president of the united states and replacing them with Vahid Halilhodžić, who became the new bus and Francis Graille the new president of the united states. [ 9 ] The club ‘s form dwindled as they slipped far down the table and finally, a separate from owners Canal+ became inevitable. [ 9 ] At the startle of the twenty-first century, PSG struggled to rescale the heights despite the charming of Ronaldinho and the goals of Pauleta. [ 1 ] Five more trophies arrived in the shape of three french Cups ( including one against Le Classique arch-rivals Marseille in 2006 ), one French League Cup and one UEFA Intertoto Cup, but the clubhouse became better known for lurching from one high-profile crisis to another. [ 9 ] [ 32 ] [ 33 ] Following years of mismanagement, the club ‘s form dwindled as they slipped far down the table and a split from Canal+ became inevitable. [ 2 ] [ 9 ] The french premium television receiver channel sold the clubhouse to Colony Capital in 2006. The site, however, only got worse and PSG spent the 2006–07 and 2007–08 campaigns staving off relegations. [ 2 ] [ 9 ] The latter was the most dramatic. Marred by poor people results and sports fan violence, Paris avoided the drop on the final match after a 2–1 winnings at Sochaux. The hero was Ivorian striker Amara Diané who scored both goals that night. Despite not enjoying the star condition of early current or past PSG greats, Diané is silent considered a legend by most parisian fans. [ 4 ]

QSI ownership and domestic hegemony ( 2011–present )

After two years of solid advance and stability under the stewardship of coach Antoine Kombouaré and president Robin Leproux, the fortunes of Paris Saint-Germain changed dramatically when Qatar Sports Investments ( QSI ) purchased the baseball club in 2011. [ 9 ] The coup d’etat made PSG not lone the richest clubhouse in France but one of the wealthiest in the populace. [ 34 ] Club president Nasser Al-Khelaifi pledged to form a team adequate to of winning the UEFA Champions League and making the cabaret France ‘s biggest name. [ 9 ] [ 35 ]
Club legend Leonardo was brought back in a clean conductor capacitance and oversaw a spend spree in summer 2011 that has so far been unprecedented in Ligue 1 history, including the signings of Blaise Matuidi, Salvatore Sirigu, Maxwell, Kevin Gameiro and Javier Pastore. [ 9 ] As a resultant role, the Parisians have dominated french football, despite finishing behind Montpellier in 2011–12, the elusive league crown was last brought back to Paris in 2012–13 driven by star player Zlatan Ibrahimović, team master Thiago Silva and celebrated director Carlo Ancelotti. [ 9 ] [ 36 ] During the season, ahead of the winter transfer deadline it was announced that David Beckham signed a five-month deal with the club. [ 37 ] [ 38 ] Zlatan ‘s 30-goal haul about single-handed led the capital side to its first gear Ligue 1 deed in 19 years, and one-third overall. They besides became a regular in the knockout stages of the Champions League, [ 39 ] being eliminated from the UEFA Champions League on aside goals by Barcelona in the quarter-finals after drawing both games. [ 36 ] Big money signings continued with the arrivals of Edinson Cavani in 2013 for a league read of €64 million, [ 40 ] making it the one-sixth largest transfer in history and David Luiz in 2014 for a £50 million transportation fee, a world-record transfer for a defender. [ 41 ] [ 42 ] Despite the deviation of Carlo Ancelotti, PSG kept its winning ways under Laurent Blanc. The club secured a maid domestic treble ( Ligue 1, Coupe de la Ligue and Trophée des Champions ) in the 2013–14 season, before claiming an unprecedented national quadruple ( Ligue 1, Coupe de France, Coupe de la Ligue and Trophée des Champions ) twice in a row in 2014–15 and 2015–16, winning the latter with a record-breaking 96 points, becoming the only inaugural french men ‘s team to achieve that feat. [ 43 ] [ 44 ] clean from three straight UEFA Europa League titles with Sevilla, Unai Emery was hired by PSG for his european pedigree. [ 35 ] But with star player Zlatan Ibrahimović gone, the cabaret endured a disappoint 2016–17 season. [ 45 ] [ 46 ] Paris were pipped to the Ligue 1 style by Monaco, missing out on top spot for the foremost meter in five years. meanwhile, in the UEFA Champions League, the club suffered respective disappoint nights, [ 39 ] including arguably the club ‘s most painful continental frustration in the ill-famed and controversial “ La Remontada ” ( “ The Comeback ” ) against Barcelona, losing 6–1 in the irregular peg of the orotund of sixteen, despite winning the foremost leg in France by a score of 4–0. [ 47 ]
Neymar Jr official presentation for Paris Saint-Germain, 4 August 2017. Neymar during his presentation in 2017, after becoming the most expensive player ever. In response, PSG signed Neymar Jr. for a world-record fee of €222 million, making him the most expensive musician ever and french prodigy Kylian Mbappé on an initial loan, which was made permanent in 2018 in a transfer worth €180 million plus lend ons, making him both the second- most expensive actor and most expensive adolescent, assembling a awful assail trio alongside Edinson Cavani. [ 48 ] The capital club reclaimed the Ligue 1 title and besides won the Trophée des Champions, the Coupe de la Ligue and the Coupe de France, clinching the domestic quadruple for the third time in four seasons. [ 49 ] Despite their massive consumption, in the Champions League, PSG lost to Real Madrid in the round of 16, leading director Unai Emery to leave the club at the end of the season. [ 50 ]
In May 2018, Thomas Tuchel signed a biennial contract with PSG, replacing Unai Emery. [ 51 ] Paris Saint-Germain again fell in the Champions League round of 16 in 2018–19, suffering a shock 3–1 defeat at home to Manchester United after winning the first leg 2–0 at Old Trafford. [ 52 ] This season, they besides won the Ligue 1 for the 8th time in their history, but lost in the Coupe de France concluding against Rennes. [ 53 ] [ 54 ] PSG were eliminated from the Coupe de la Ligue in embarrassing fashion, as they lost 2–1 at home to Guingamp in the quarterfinals. [ 55 ] [ 56 ] In 2019–20, PSG won the Ligue 1 for the 9th time in their history, despite the season ending prematurely due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and besides reclaimed the Coupe de France defeating Saint-Étienne in the final and won the last-ever Coupe de la Ligue defeating Lyon in a punishment gunfight. [ 57 ] In the 2019–20 UEFA Champions League, PSG reached the semi-finals for the second time since 1995, after a last moment 2–1 acquire over Atalanta, [ 58 ] before losing to Bayern Munich 1–0 in the finals in Lisbon, with former PSG musician Kingsley Coman scoring the winning finish. [ 59 ] Tuchel ‘s tenure at Paris Saint-Germain was marred by a fracture relationship with the club ‘s hierarchy, leading him to be dismissed on 24 December, despite placing top of their Champions League group. [ 60 ] On 2 January 2021, former PSG player Mauricio Pochettino was appointed as the fresh head coach. [ 61 ] [ 62 ] PSG ‘s good form in the Champions League continued in 2021 with a second straight UCL semi-final appearance, a first for the club. [ 63 ] In France, PSG won the Coupe de France, but failed to retain the Ligue 1 deed, finishing behind Lille, losing the league for the moment time in four years. [ 64 ] In July, PSG completed one of the most historic transfer windows in football history, exercising the choice to buy on Danilo Pereira and signing Achraf Hakimi from Inter Milan for a report fee of €60 million, Georginio Wijnaldum, Legendary Real Madrid captain Sergio Ramos and Euro 2020 ‘s player of the tournament Gianluigi Donnarumma on free transfers. [ 65 ] [ 66 ] [ 67 ] PSG ‘s concluded their transportation window with the sign of one of the greatest players of all time and record Ballon d’Or winner Lionel Messi, who by chance left Barcelona, following the exhalation of his narrow and promising defender Nuno Mendes on a season-long lend with an option to buy. [ 68 ] [ 69 ]

identity

Colours and mascot

Germain the lynx, mascot of PSG. Germain the Lynx, PSG ‘s mascot. Since their foundation, Paris Saint-Germain have represented both the city of Paris and the nearby royal town of Saint-Germain-en-Laye. [ 9 ] As a result, red, blue and white are the club ‘s traditional color. [ 70 ] The crimson and blue are parisian colours, a nod to revolutionary figures Lafayette and Jean Sylvain Bailly, and the blank is a symbol of French royalty and Saint-Germain-en-Laye. [ 70 ] [ 71 ] On the club ‘s crest, the Eiffel Tower in bolshevik and the blasphemous backdrop represent Paris, while the fleur de lys in white is a hint to the coating of arms of Saint-Germain-en-Laye. [ 71 ] [ 70 ] The fleur de lys is a imperial symbol as well and recalls that french King Louis XIV was born in the town. [ 70 ] Throughout its history, PSG have brandished respective crests, but all of them have featured the club ‘s three historic colours. [ 72 ] besides, PSG ‘s most iconic shirts have been predominantly bolshevik, blue or white, with the remaining two colours included adenine well. The club ‘s official mascot, Germain the Lynx, besides sports PSG ‘s traditional colors. [ 71 ] It was unveiled during the 2010 Tournoi de Paris in memorial of the club ‘s fortieth anniversary, and can be seen entertaining kids in the stands of the Parc des Princes or near the lurch with the players during the warm-up. [ 74 ]

Anthems and mottos

“ Allez Paris !, ” recorded by belgian actress and singer Annie Cordy in 1971, was the clubhouse ‘s first official anthem. A PSG fan from the start, she was part of an association of hundreds of celebrities who contributed to the golf club ‘s foundation in 1970. [ 75 ] [ 76 ] The golf club ‘s second base anthem, “ Allez Paris-Saint-Germain ! ” by Les Parisiens, was recorded in 1977, replacing Cordy ‘s version. An enterprise of historic PSG drawing card and music manufacturer Charles Talar, he produced and released it under his homonym criminal record tag. [ 77 ] [ 78 ] [ 79 ] The birdcall ‘s chorus became a democratic chant among PSG supporters during games. [ 80 ] A new translation, besides called “ Allez Paris-Saint-Germain !, ” was recorded in 2010 as part of the club ‘s fortieth anniversary celebrations. Sung to the tune of “ Go West “ by Village People, the lyrics were rewritten with suggestions made by fans. This is the baseball club ‘s current official hymn. [ 71 ] [ 74 ] [ 78 ] “ Ô Ville Lumière ” ( “ Oh City of Light ” ), to the tune of “ Flower of Scotland, ” is another authentic club anthem for PSG supporters. [ 81 ] [ 82 ] other noteworthy chants from supporters ‘ groups in the Boulogne and Auteuil stands include “ Le Parc est à mind ” ( “ The Parc is ours ” ), “ Paris est magique ! ” ( “ Paris is charming ! ” ) and “ Ici, c’est Paris ! ” ( “ This is Paris ! “ ). [ 71 ] [ 83 ] Both stands began exchanging these chants during PSG matches in the 1990s. [ 80 ] [ 84 ] [ 85 ] “ Paris est magique ! ” and “ Ici c’est Paris ! ” are besides the club ‘s most iconic motto or slogans. [ 71 ] [ 86 ] [ 87 ] “ Who Said I Would “ by Phill Collins is besides a traditional hymn for the fans. The song has accompanied the players ‘ entrance into the field since 1992. [ 88 ]

iconic shirts

During their beginning three seasons of being, the base shirt of Paris Saint-Germain was red with blasphemous and white details in its sleeves and neck to bring together the three colours of the club : the loss and blue of Paris, and the white of Saint-Germain-en-Laye. [ 89 ] [ 90 ] During the 2010–11 season, PSG wore a bolshevik shirt during home plate matches to commemorate their fortieth anniversary. [ 91 ] The connection between Paris Saint-Germain and the city ‘s fashion houses is a longstanding one. french manner designer Daniel Hechter became PSG president in 1973 and designed the club ‘s traditional home look that lapp year : a aristocratic shirt with a bolshevik vertical chevron flanked by two thinner whiten stripes ( blue-white-red-white-blue ). [ 89 ] [ 92 ] First wear in the 1973–74 season, the alleged “ Hechter shirt ” has remained the classic home identity of PSG ever since. [ 93 ] [ 94 ] [ 95 ]
The three most iconic shirts of Paris Saint-Germain Football Club. The three most iconic shirts of Paris Saint-Germain. The celebrated jersey made its debut during a home Ligue 2 game against Red Star on November 10, 1973. [ 96 ] This was besides the club ‘s maid match at the Parc des Princes. PSG won 3–1 as Othniel Dossevi scored the clubhouse ‘s first goal at the stadium equally well as the first with the Hechter shirt. [ 97 ] PSG stars from the 1990s and 2000s like Raí, Ronaldinho and Pauleta are associated with this kit. While wearing it, the capital baseball club reached five european semi-finals in a rowing between 1993 and 1997, claimed the 1995–96 UEFA Cup Winners ‘ Cup and achieved eight back-to-back wins against Le Classique arch-rivals Olympique de Marseille between 2002 and 2004. [ 98 ] The general impression is that Hechter based his universe on the red-and-white jersey worn by Ajax, the dominant allele team in Europe at the clock time, but with the french flag in mind. [ 89 ] [ 92 ] [ 12 ] Hechter himself has denied this, though, alternatively claiming he was inspired by the Ford Mustang. He transposed the car ‘s hood stripes on the shirt and employed the three colours of the club. [ 89 ] The Hechter shirt has two alternate versions : the “ reversed Hechter ” ( red-white-blue-white-red ), introduced in the 1974–75 season, and the “ egg white Hechter ” ( white-blue-red-blue-white ), which premiered in the 1994–95 season. [ 89 ] [ 95 ] [ 99 ]

Read more: Lille OSC

It was with the club ‘s most iconic away equip, though, that fans saw the first big PSG team which won their maid Coupe de France titles in 1982 and 1983, experienced their first european campaign in 1983 and claimed their inaugural league pate in 1986. The shirt was white with gloomy and red vertical stripes on the left. [ 93 ] Like the Hechter jersey, it debuted in the 1973–74 temper as the aside kit. [ 89 ] Promoted by PSG president Francis Borelli, the white shirt was the club ‘s home identity from 1981 to 1990. [ 93 ] now known as the “ Borelli shirt, ” it is synonym with PSG legends from the 1980s like Safet Sušić, Luis Fernández and Dominique Bathenay. [ 94 ] [ 100 ]

Crest evolution

Logo du Paris Saint-Germain entre 1992 et 1996. PSG logo between 1992 and 1996. The first crown of Paris Saint-Germain was basically the same as the master Paris FC ( PFC ) logo. Having to merge and give parturition to the golf club using Stade Saint-Germain ‘s stadium, the PFC crest kept its original design but the name below it changed from “ Paris FC ” to “ Paris Saint-Germain Football Club. ” This badge consisted of a amobarbital sodium football with a crimson vessel inside it. The latter is a historic symbol of Paris and is portray in the city ‘s coat of arms. The appoint of the clubhouse was written below in bolshevik. PSG, however, split from PFC in 1972 and frankincense needed a newly crest. [ 101 ] Representing both Paris and Saint-Germain-en-Laye, the golf club ‘s second crest became the basis of the one the fans know today. The round logo featured the Eiffel Tower in red against a blue background with two Saint-Germain symbols in white between its legs : a fleur de lys and Louis XIV ‘s cradle. [ 101 ] This crest was created by Christian Lentretien, former PSG board member and publicist by profession, in 1972. [ 102 ] It was first used until 1982. [ 101 ] The Parc des Princes, the clubhouse ‘s home stadium, was added below the peak in 1982 and lasted until 1990. Following a brief return of the traditional crown between 1990 and 1992, former owners Canal+ radically changed it in 1992. The new model had the acronym “ PSG ” in white against a blue-white-red-white-blue setting ( like the color model of the Hechter shirt ) with “ Paris Saint-Germain ” underneath in white against a black background. [ 101 ] Under coerce from supporters, the traditional crest returned in 1995 with “ Paris Saint-Germain ” above the column and “ 1970 ” below the birthplace. This logo went through a slight face lift in 2002. At the request of the golf club ‘s Qatari owners, the traditional crown undergo a major makeover in 2013. [ 101 ] “ Paris ” is now written in bad white bluff letters above a big Eiffel Tower, distinctly putting forward the brand “ Paris ” alternatively of “ Paris Saint-Germain. ” Underneath it, “ Saint-Germain ” is written in smaller letters below the fleur de lys. [ 86 ] [ 103 ] In contrast, the cradle and the baseball club ‘s establish year “ 1970 ” were left out. [ 103 ] PSG deputy general coach Jean-Claude Blanc said : “ We are called Paris Saint-Germain but, above all, we are called Paris. ” [ 86 ]

friendly tournaments

Paris Saint-Germain used to host two very celebrated invitational competitions : the Tournoi de Paris and the Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy. [ 104 ] [ 105 ] Regarded as French football ‘s most esteemed friendly tournament, the Tournoi de Paris is considered a precursor of both the Intercontinental Cup and the FIFA Club World Cup. [ 104 ] [ 106 ] PSG began hosting it in 1975 and were crowned champions a record seven times. [ 104 ] Held at the Parc des Princes, the Tournoi de Paris was last organized in 2012. [ 104 ] [ 107 ] The Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy was an indoor football tournament founded by PSG in 1984 and held per annum until 1991 at the AccorHotels Arena in the 12th arrondissement of Paris. Played indoors on a synthetic battlefield and featuring seven-a-side teams, the rival featured hosts PSG and five more clubs. The Parisians lifted the trophy on two occasions, more than any other cabaret. [ 105 ]

Grounds

Stadiums

Paris Saint-Germain played their first gear game at their current family stadium, the 47,929-seater Parc des Princes, against Ligue 2 promotion rivals Red Star on November 10, 1973. [ 97 ] [ 108 ] It was the curtain-raiser for that temper ‘s opening Ligue 1 match between Paris FC ( PFC ) and Sochaux. [ 97 ] PSG moved into the ground upon its recurrence to Ligue 1 in 1974, ironically the like year that PFC were relegated. Up until that point it had been the home venue of PFC. [ 2 ] [ 13 ] During their early years, PSG played at respective grounds including the main stadium of the Stade Municipal Georges Lefèvre sports building complex, the Stade Jean-Bouin, the Stade de Paris and even the Parc des Princes a few times despite the reluctance of PFC. [ 109 ] [ 110 ] Ever since PSG moved to the Parc, the Stade Georges Lefèvre ‘s artificial turf and supergrass football pitches have hosted train sessions and home matches for the club ‘s academy sides. [ 110 ] [ 111 ] The complex is located in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, barely across the street from the Camp des Loges, the clubhouse ‘s train center. [ 111 ]

train facilities

Located in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, the Camp des Loges has been the club ‘s aim earth since 1970. [ 112 ] The current Camp delaware Loges, built on the same locate as the old one, was inaugurated in November 2008. [ 113 ] It was then renamed Ooredoo Training Centre in September 2013 as character of a sponsorship deal with Ooredoo. [ 114 ] The Paris Saint-Germain Training Center will be the club ‘s new train flat coat and sports complex. [ 115 ] [ 116 ] [ 117 ] It will replace the Camp des Loges upon its completion in June 2023. [ 118 ] [ 119 ] Owned and financed by the baseball club, the venue will bring together PSG ‘s male football, handball and judo teams, american samoa well as the football and handball academies. [ 115 ] [ 118 ] The club, however, will remain closely linked to their historic birthplace in Saint-Germain-en-Laye as the Camp des Loges will become the discipline prime of the female football team and academy. [ 120 ] [ 121 ]

hold

Paris Saint-Germain is the most popular football club in France and one of the most widely supported teams in the earth. [ 122 ] [ 123 ] Famous PSG fans include Nicolas Sarkozy, Tony Parker, Tom Brady, Patrick Dempsey, Victoria Azarenka, Teddy Riner and DJ Snake. [ 124 ] Lacking a big passionate fanbase, the golf club began offering cheaper season tickets to new supporters in 1976. [ 83 ] [ 125 ] [ 126 ] These fans were placed in the Kop K, located in the K section of the Borelli point of view at the Parc des Princes. [ 126 ] [ 127 ] Following an increase in tag prices, Kop K supporters moved to the Boulogne digest in 1978, and the Kop of Boulogne ( KoB ) was born. [ 126 ] [ 128 ] There, the club ‘s first Italian-style extremist group, Boulogne Boys, was founded in 1985. [ 128 ] other KoB groups, however, took british hooligans as doubtful character models and violence quickly escalated. [ 125 ] PSG supporters ‘ groups have been linked to football vandalism always since. [ 128 ] PSG owners Canal+ responded in 1991 by encouraging and financing non-violent fans of the KoB point of view to take target in the Auteuil stand at the other end of the Parc des Princes. The Virage Auteuil was born, aboard Supras Auteuil, its most ill-famed ultras. [ 129 ] At first the measure worked but, slowly, a violent competition arose between the two stands. [ 129 ] [ 130 ] Things came to a pass in 2010 before a couple against Olympique de Marseille in Paris. Boulogne fan Yann Lorence was killed following a competitiveness between groups from both stands outside the Parc des Princes, forcing PSG president Robin Leproux to take action. [ 131 ] [ 132 ] The cabaret exiled the supporters ‘ groups from the Parc des Princes and banned them from all PSG matches in what was known as plan Leproux. [ 131 ] [ 132 ] It made PSG pay the price in terms of air, with one of Europe ‘s most fear venues now subdued. [ 130 ] [ 132 ] For their contribution, erstwhile Virage Auteuil supporters formed the Collectif Ultras Paris ( CUP ) in February 2016, with the aim of reclaiming their place at the stadium. [ 133 ] In October 2016, after a six-year absence, the club agreed to their return. [ 132 ] Grouped in the Auteuil end of the stadium, the CUP presently is the only extremist association formally recognized by PSG. [ 132 ] [ 134 ] The extremist drift has besides started to come back to life in the Boulogne stand. New groups Block Parisii, Paname Rebirth and Résistance Parisienne are trying to convince the club of relaunching the Kop of Boulogne. [ 135 ]

Rivalries

Paris Saint-Germain shares an intense competition with Olympique de Marseille ; matches between the two teams are referred to as Le Classique. [ 136 ] Equivalent to Spain ‘s El Clásico, [ 137 ] the regular is the biggest competition in France and one of the greatest in the worldly concern. [ 138 ] [ 139 ] The level of animosity is such that it extends outside of the pitch. Both sets of fans have been clashing against each other about since the very first encounters between the two sides. [ 140 ] [ 141 ] The couple are the two most successful clubs in french football history and the merely two french teams to have won major european trophies. furthermore, PSG and OM were the prevailing forces in the land prior to the emergence of Olympique Lyonnais in the 2000s. [ 136 ] They are besides the two most popular clubs in France and the two most followed french teams outside the country, ahead of Lyon. [ 122 ] [ 123 ] [ 140 ] Both clubs are at or near the top of the attendance lists every season adenine well. [ 140 ] In their early meetings during the 1970s there was little indication the two would become deadly adversaries. The newly formed Parisians were trying to assemble a competitive team, while the Olympians were Ligue 1 contenders. It all changed in 1986, when PSG won its beginning championship and OM were bought by Bernard Tapie. [ 142 ] By the end of the decade, PSG were fighting for the 1988–89 title against Tapie ‘s star-studded Marseille, and sparks flew for the first prison term. [ 140 ] [ 22 ] The accusations made by PSG president Francis Borelli against Tapie and OM for fixing matches during that season were a big subscriber to their growing antagonism. [ 33 ] The 1990s were the real starting point of the competition, though. french television channel Canal+ bought PSG in 1991 with the drive of breaking Marseille ‘s hegemony, but agreed with Tapie to fuel the animosity between them as a manner to spice up the league. [ 140 ] [ 22 ] now with similar fiscal ability, PSG and OM established themselves as crown contenders in the entitle race. [ 143 ] Both sides were less successful in the late 1990s and throughout the 2000s, but the competition remained just as fierce. [ 142 ] [ 143 ] however, since the 2010s, the match-up has been completely dominated by PSG. The investment of their mega-rich qatar owners has created a wide gap between them and Marseille. [ 143 ]

possession and finances

swedish striker Zlatan Ibrahimović ( center ) became the club ‘s first high-profile sign in 2012. During its inaugural three years of being, Paris Saint-Germain was fan-owned and had 20,000 socios. [ 1 ] [ 125 ] The baseball club was run by control panel members Guy Crescent, Pierre-Étienne Guyot and Henri Patrelle. [ 4 ] [ 125 ] A group of affluent french businessmen, led by Daniel Hechter and Francis Borelli, would then buy the clubhouse in 1973. [ 3 ] PSG changed hands in 1991, when Canal+ took over, and then again in 2006 with the arrival of Colony Capital. [ 5 ] Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, the Emir of Qatar, has been PSG ‘s owner since 2011 through state-run shareholding arrangement Qatar Sports Investments ( QSI ). [ 144 ] A auxiliary of Qatar ‘s sovereign wealth fund Qatar Investment Authority ( QIA ), QSI became the club ‘s majority shareholders in June 2011 and sole shareholders in March 2012. [ 5 ] [ 144 ] [ 145 ] This means PSG are a state-owned club, the only of its kind, and therefore one of the richest teams in the world. [ 34 ] [ 146 ] [ 147 ] QSI chair Nasser Al-Khelaifi has been PSG president since the coup d’etat. [ 148 ] Al Thani, however, has the concluding password on every major decision of the golf club. [ 149 ] He is both the president of the QIA and the founder of QSI. [ 150 ] Upon its arrival, QSI pledged to form a team capable of winning the UEFA Champions League and making the club France ‘s biggest name. [ 9 ] PSG have spent over €1.3bn on actor transfers since the summer of 2011. [ 42 ] These massive expenditures have translated in PSG ‘s domination of french football but have not yet brought home the covet Champions League trophy arsenic well as causing problems with UEFA ‘s Financial Fair Play regulations. [ 41 ] [ 148 ] [ 151 ] As of the 2019–20 season, PSG have the seventh-highest tax income in the footballing world with an annual employee turnover of €541m according to Deloitte, and are the worldly concern ‘s one-ninth most valuable football baseball club, worth $ 2.5bn according to Forbes magazine. [ 152 ] [ 153 ] PSG ‘s strong fiscal position has been sustained by the club ‘s Qatari owners ; [ 154 ] the team ‘s on-pitch success ; [ 41 ] high-profile signings like Zlatan Ibrahimović, David Beckham, Neymar, Kylian Mbappé and Lionel Messi ; [ 42 ] and lucrative sponsorship deals with the Qatar Tourism Authority, Nike, Accor and Air Jordan. [ 154 ] [ 155 ] Throughout their history, though, PSG have rarely been profitable. [ 156 ] Prior to the Qatar buyout, the club ‘s accumulative losses amounted to €300m. [ 156 ] [ 157 ]

Honours

As of the end of the 2020–21 Ligue 1 season.[32]

Paris Saint-Germain holds many records, [ 158 ] most notably being the most successful french club in history in terms of official titles won, with 45. [ 1 ] [ 32 ] Domestically, PSG have clinched nine Ligue 1 championships, a record fourteen Coupe de France, a record nine Coupe de la Ligue, a record ten-spot Trophée des Champions and one Ligue 2 title. In external club football, they have claimed one UEFA Cup Winners ‘ Cup and one UEFA Intertoto Cup. [ 32 ] Additionally, PSG have won 25 unofficial titles. [ 159 ] [ 160 ] [ 161 ] [ 162 ] Their victory in the 1995–96 UEFA Cup Winners ‘ Cup makes PSG the exclusive french side to have won this trophy a well as one of only two french clubs to have won a major european rival and the youngest european team to do indeed. [ 29 ] [ 163 ] The Parisians are besides the club with the most consecutive seasons in the top-flight ( 47 seasons in Ligue 1 since 1974–75 ). [ 164 ] Furthermore, PSG are the lone slope to have won the Coupe de France without conceding a single goal ( 1992–93 and 2016–17 ), [ 165 ] five Coupe de la Ligue in a row ( 2014–2018 ), [ 166 ] four back-to-back Coupe de France ( 2015–2018 ), [ 167 ] and eight back-to-back Trophée des Champions ( 2013–2020 ). [ 168 ] PSG have won all four home titles in a individual season on four occasions. This feat is known as the domestic quadruple. The Red and Blues have completed the domestic double, the league and league cup doubling, the domestic cup double and the domestic soprano several times a well. Therefore, PSG are the club with the most domestic doubles and league and league cup doubles, and the entirely team to have won the domestic cup double over, the domestic triple and the domestic quadruple. [ 32 ] [ 169 ] [ 170 ]

domestic

european

Doubles and trebles

Players

As of 7 October 2021.[171]

First-team police squad

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

Out on loanword

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

youth players under narrow

eminence : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

Staff and management

As of 12 July 2021.[171][173][174]

bodied hierarchy

technical staff

operation staff

Club performance coordinator

Italy

Sports scientists

France
Brazil
Australia
France
Italy

checkup staff

Chief medical doctor

France

Doctor

France

Physiotherapist coordinator

France

Physiotherapists

France
France
France
Brazil
Italy
Italy

Podologist

France

Medical assistant

France

References

Read more: S.L. Benfica

The MMS Institute Thailand

A goal is a way of determining where you are going. It is the “ there ” that you identify from your advantage point of “ here. ” Between where you are and where you want to go is an invisible cord ; when you stake out and define where it is you want to go, you energize that cord. The promise of your goals are what creates the active tension that pulls you mechanically towards their realization .
We all have visions ; what we want to accomplish, what we want to achieve or attain, images of how we would like our lives to be. What transforms those visions into reality is the willingness to establish them into real goals. By doing this, you begin to chart a naturally that will take you to the heart of your highest visions and dreams and make them into reality .
“ Goal setting ” has become a preferably over-used term in the fields of career and life guidance, but there ’ s no manner around it : it is hush the most effective direction to get you from where you are now to where you want to go. conventional wisdom may seem ordinary, but the might of it lies in its universal joint truth .
I have been using goals with my clients and myself for over three decades and I know that the procedure works. It activates the “ Laws of attraction ” by having you articulate your wishes and desires, by being very clear and specific and besides by being brave enough to specify a date. All the people that I have “ mid-wifed ” to success have started the process by establishing their goals. If they didn ’ t have a finish, I never would have known how to support them, nor would they have known what steps to take or when to take them.

Your goals are what move you along your personal game board of achiever. As you achieve each one that you set for yourself, you move yourself closer to the sight of success that you have created in your mind ’ south eye. Goals are mileposts along the road that help motivate you as you reach for your finish up line. The size and oscilloscope of the goals are not important- they can be small or meaning ; what matters most is that you take the time to articulate them .
A Goal is a affirmation of a measurable result to be achieved. Goals provide a mean for translating wishes into world. They help you “ know when you win ” and provide a basis for determining where effort should be focused. All of your goals should follow the S.M.A.R.T. acronym .

SPECIFIC

To make your wish particular, you must articulate precisely what you mean and precisely what it is that you want to achieve. For example, if your goal is to climb the corporate ladder within your company, you need to articulate what that means for you. possibly your goal is to finally become president of the company. Or, another model I recently heard from a workshop player, if your wish is to play professional basketball, you might specify which stead you want to play and for which team .

MEASURABLE

The second base standard is that it must be measurable. You must be able to count, or mark, the consequence in some means. In the corporate site, the marker would be your appointment by the board to the position of president of the united states .

ATTAINABLE

The third base criteria is that is must be attainable according to your personal visibility. Is it potential for you given your features, characteristics, assets, and limitations to achieve this goal ? You can ’ triiodothyronine be five feet improbable and realistically play center for a major league basketball team. If your firm requires all executives to have a college degree, you can ’ thymine expect to become president of the company without one. In other words, the goals must be within your kingdom of capabilities.

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REALISTIC

Is it realistic for you to play professional testis if you have bad knees ? Is it realistic for you to become president of your ship’s company if you know it means relocating to another celibate with aging parents who require your worry and attention ? In other words, does your goal make feel ? There is a fine line between reaching for the stars and losing your grip on reality. The best manner to test to see if your goal is realistic is to notice how you present it to yourself or to others. If you are defensive about your finish, it credibly lacks platonism .

TIME BASED

Fifth, you want to anchor your instruction of consequence in a timeframe. Every goal must have a completion date attached. If a date is not attached, the hope result turns into an purpose quite than a goal, postponed by the ageless promise of “ someday, ” crippled by the “ not now syndrome. ” Dates perpetrate intentions to calendar realities. They target the timeframe for the goal and prevent it from withering away into eternity .
Take your goals and make each one “ SMART. ” Make certain you put down the date when you want them accomplished .
Action steps constantly start with a verb such as : write, research, electronic mail, call, buy, etc…
Starting the tax with a verb enables you to immediately know the action you must take. Take one goal and create mini legal action steps for it.

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Ask yourself these questions:

  • How do you feel about your goals?
  • How do you feel about the tasks?
  • Are they aligned?
  • Do you see a direct relationship between each goal and the tasks you have established?
  • Can you see the path to fruition?

Post your goals at your desk, on your refrigerator door, on your bathroom mirror, or on a muggy notice on your computer desk shield. You want to consciously focus on your goals every day to make sure that you are on path .
once per quarter, review your goals to ensure that you are focused on your highest priorities. Most of all do yourself so that you produce the results that you are capable and ultimately get what you want .

Lille OSC

Association football club in Lille
football club
Lille Olympique Sporting Club ( french pronunciation : ​ [ lil ɔlɛ̃pik spɔʁtɪŋ klœb ] ), normally called LOSC, LOSC Lille, or plainly Lille, is a french professional football club based in Lille, Hauts-de-France. They are the stream champions of Ligue 1, the top grade of french football. Lille has played its home matches since 2012 at Stade Pierre-Mauroy in nearby Villeneuve d’Ascq, which replaced the club ‘s former home of Stade Lille-Metropole.

Reading: Lille OSC

Lille was founded as a resultant role of a fusion between Olympique Lillois and SC Fives in 1944. Both clubs were founding members of the french Division 1 and Lillois was the league ‘s inaugural champions. Under the Lille emblem, the club has won four league titles ( in 1946, 1954, 2011 and 2021 ) and six Coupe de France titles. Lille ‘s most successful period was the ten from 1946 to 1956 when the team was led by managers George Berry and André Cheuva. [ 2 ] [ 3 ] Lille has a long-standing competition with nearby cabaret RC Lens, with whom they contest the Derby du Nord. The club is owned by Merlyn Partners SCSp, a Luxembourg based investing fund .

history [edit ]

1944–1955 : The beginning ten [edit ]

Before the second World War, the city of Lille had two clubs in Ligue 1 ; Olympique Lillois and Sporting Club Fivois. Weakened by the war, the two clubs decided to merge in the fall of 1944, giving give birth to Lille Olympique Sporting Club ( LOSC ). Within its first decade of universe, the new club won two league titles and reached the moment position for four back-to-back seasons. In the Coupe de France the golf club accumulated five wins in seven finals, including five consecutive finals. The final examination of the Latin Cup was besides reached .

1956–1980 : Lille loses its direction [edit ]

Lille were relegated for the first gear time in 1956. The baseball club became a mid-table english and in the late 1960s, after a long period of anonymity, and weighed down by a lack of facilities and resources, Lille abandoned its professional status. It was feared that the club might disappear. however, some young leaders, such as Max Pommerolle, came and gave newly drift to the club. Nevertheless, the results remained erratic and the only titles that ignited the fans ‘ passions were won in the Second Division .

1980–2000 : Laying the foundations for future success [edit ]

In July 1980, Lille was the first french baseball club to opt for the status of a desegregate economy company, of which the city of Lille became the majority stockholder. The team of presidents Amyot, Deschot and Dewailly all struggled to compete with the top teams in the country. Jacques Amyot ‘s resignation in 1990 led to three more difficult years for the club which compromised its very universe. It took Bernard Lecomte ‘s arrival in 1993 to set the club finances on the road to recovery. After a final relegation in 1997, the team trained by bosnian coach Vahid Halilhodžić was soon promoted back to the elite, in the same year the french Football League was privatised .

2000–present : A brace climb to the crown [edit ]

In just its first season back in the top trajectory 2000–01 french Division 1, Lille qualified for Europe for the first time in the club ‘s history, booking its place in the 2001–02 Champions League. On the back of the cabaret ‘s raw status, Lille entered into a critical new era under the guidance of president and chief executive officer Michel Seydoux and coach Claude Puel. The cabaret left the diachronic Stade Grimonprez-Jooris to join the Stadium Lille Métropole and became a regular on the european setting. Amongst its most emphatic results was the 1–0 victory over Manchester United at the Stade de France in 2005, the 2–0 gloat over Milan in San Siro in 2006 and the 1–0 home win over Liverpool in 2010. A steady development off the pitch ( inauguration of the Domaine de Luchin training building complex in 2007, opening of the Grand Stade in 2012 ), coupled with the sporting progress under the technical pass of coach Rudi Garcia, took Lille back to the summit of the french game with the League and Cup bivalent in 2011 ( 56 years after the cabaret ‘s last trophy ). In 2012, LOSC confirmed its place at the top table of the domestic game with another qualification for Europe ‘s most prestigious club competition, the Champions League in 2012–13. With the club eat up equitable outside the UCL places that temper, Garcia left to join Roma, while early Montpellier coach René Girard was appointed the new Lille director. [ 4 ] After two years in charge of the club, Girard left his role as the drumhead coach by reciprocal accept. He was joined by assistants Gerard Bernadet and Nicolas Girard in making the exit. In May 2015, the Ivory Coast national team head coach Hervé Renard was appointed as the new director. On 11 November 2015, Renard was terminated as director and was replaced by Frederic Antonetti. [ 5 ] [ 6 ] On 23 November 2016, a class after being appointed, Lille terminated Antonetti ‘s contract with the club lying second last in the table. [ 7 ] In March 2017, Lille appointed Marcelo Bielsa as new coach of the club. In November 2017, Bielsa was suspended by Lille following an unauthorized stumble to Chile with the club lying second from penetrate on the mesa again and entirely managing 3 wins from the first 14 games of the season. [ 8 ] On 23 December 2017, Bielsa was terminated by Lille and replaced with former Saint-Etienne coach Christophe Galtier. [ 9 ] After a unmanageable 2017–2018 temper, Lille managed to avoid relegation to Ligue 2 by defeating Toulouse 3–2 in the second last game of the campaign. [ 10 ] In the 2018–19 Ligue 1 season, Lille secured the second topographic point to qualify for the 2019–20 UEFA Champions League group stagecoach, they returned to the contest after a seven-year absence. [ 11 ] Two seasons late, in the 2020–21 season, Lille won their first Ligue 1 style in 10 years and the one-fourth overall in club history under the guidance of Christophe Galtier. [ 12 ]

Stadiums [edit ]

Lille lining up at the Stade Pierre-Mauroy before its first peer in 2012 Stade Pierre-Mauroy was inaugurated in 2012. primitively named the Centre Olympique de Lille Est, the club ‘s sporting venue is spread over five hectares and features three natural grass football pitches and one synthetic pitch, equally well as a number of buildings including a medical centre and gymnasium. These attributes had seen the club house partially of the LOSC Youth Academy here, before all the club ‘s operations were moved to the Domaine de Luchin in Camphin-en-Pé. [ 13 ]

Club rivalries [edit ]

The Derby du Nord is a football meet contested between Lille and RC Lens. The bowler hat name refers only to their geographic location in France since Lille is the only cabaret of the two actually situated in the department of Nord. Lens are situated in the western department of Pas-de-Calais. The name can besides refer to matches involving Lille and Valenciennes as both clubs are located within Nord, however, the match historically refers to matches involving Lille and Lens. As a consequence, the Lille–Valenciennes catch is sometimes referred to as Le Petit Derby du Nord. The two clubs first met in 1937 when Lille were playing under the Olympique Lillois emblem. ascribable to each club ‘s cheeseparing proximity towards each other being separated by only 40 kilometres ( 25 nautical mile ) and sociological differences between each club ‘s supporters, a boisterous competition developed. The Derby du Nord is underpinned by social and economic differences, since the city of Lens is known as an previous, propertyless, industrial city and Lille as a middle-class, modern, internationally oriented one. Nowadays the matches, which can spark intense feelings on both sides, have gained bulge as they may determine berths in continental competitions .

Players [edit ]

current team [edit ]

As of 1 December 2021[14]

bill : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

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early players under contract [edit ]

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

Out on lend [edit ]

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

Reserve team [edit ]

note : Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality .

noteworthy past players [edit ]

Records [edit ]

Most appearances [edit ]

top scorers [edit ]

management and staff [edit ]

Lille Olympique Sporting Club – LOSC Lille ( SASP ) [ 15 ]

Coaching history [edit ]

former coaches include Georges Heylens ( 1984–89 ), a former belgian international player, Jacques Santini ( 1989–92 ), who coached the France national team between 2002 and 2004, Bruno Metsu ( 1992–93 ), who coached the Senegal national team at the 2002 World Cup, Pierre Mankowski ( 1993–94 ), who was once the assistant coach of the France home team and Vahid Halilhodžić ( 1998–02 ), who can be credited with the club ‘s revival in the late nineties. Rudi Garcia, who played for Lille from 1980 to 1988, replaced Claude Puel at the begin of the 2008 season. Puel had been with Lille since 2002. Thanks to his successes with the club, Puel had been approached by portuguese baseball club Porto to replace José Mourinho and league rivals Lyon to replace Alain Perrin ; he ultimately decided to join Lyon after six seasons at the club .

Honours [edit ]

domestic [edit ]

Europe [edit ]

References [edit ]

Read more: Real Sociedad